Use of a locking compression plate for equine proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis: 29 cases (2008-2014)

R. Russell Sakai, Laurie R. Goodrich, Scott A Katzman, Valerie J. Moorman, Britta S. Leise, Christopher E. Kawcak, Larry D Galuppo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe clinical use of a locking compression plate (LCP) for proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ) arthrodesis in horses and compare outcomes for horses that underwent the procedure as treatment for fracture of the middle phalanx (P2) versus other causes. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 29 client-owned horses. PROCEDURES Medical records of 2 veterinary teaching hospitals from 2008 through 2014 were reviewed to identify horses that underwent PIPJ arthrodesis of 1 limb. Signalment, surgical, and outcome-related variables were recorded. Owners were contacted from 1 to 6 years after surgery to determine rehabilitation time, current use of the horse, and overall owner satisfaction with the procedure. Success was determined on the basis of owner satisfaction and outcome for intended use. Variables of interest were compared statistically between horses that underwent surgery for P2 fracture versus other reasons. RESULTS 14 horses underwent surgery for treatment of P2 fracture, and 15 had surgery because of osteoarthritis, subluxation, or osteochondrosis. Median convalescent time after surgery (with no riding or unrestricted exercise) was 7 months. Four horses were euthanized; of 23 known alive at follow-up, 22 were not lame, and 18 had returned to their intended use (8 and 10 at higher and lower owner-reported levels of work, respectively). Horses undergoing arthrodesis for reasons other than fracture were significantly more likely to return to their previous level of work. Twenty-two of 24 owners contacted indicated satisfaction with the procedure. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Surgical arthrodesis of the PIPJ was successful in most horses of the study population. Various nuances of the system for fracture repair need to be understood prior to its use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1460-1466
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume253
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Fingerprint

Arthrodesis
Horses
Joints
horses
surgery
arthrodesis
Osteochondrosis
Animal Hospitals
osteochondrosis
rehabilitation (people)
phalanges
osteoarthritis
Teaching Hospitals
Osteoarthritis
Medical Records
exercise
Rehabilitation
Extremities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Use of a locking compression plate for equine proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis : 29 cases (2008-2014). / Sakai, R. Russell; Goodrich, Laurie R.; Katzman, Scott A; Moorman, Valerie J.; Leise, Britta S.; Kawcak, Christopher E.; Galuppo, Larry D.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 253, No. 11, 01.12.2018, p. 1460-1466.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sakai, R. Russell ; Goodrich, Laurie R. ; Katzman, Scott A ; Moorman, Valerie J. ; Leise, Britta S. ; Kawcak, Christopher E. ; Galuppo, Larry D. / Use of a locking compression plate for equine proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis : 29 cases (2008-2014). In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2018 ; Vol. 253, No. 11. pp. 1460-1466.
@article{be04f8268b3547ee975cdb7df5f5b06a,
title = "Use of a locking compression plate for equine proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis: 29 cases (2008-2014)",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE To describe clinical use of a locking compression plate (LCP) for proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ) arthrodesis in horses and compare outcomes for horses that underwent the procedure as treatment for fracture of the middle phalanx (P2) versus other causes. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 29 client-owned horses. PROCEDURES Medical records of 2 veterinary teaching hospitals from 2008 through 2014 were reviewed to identify horses that underwent PIPJ arthrodesis of 1 limb. Signalment, surgical, and outcome-related variables were recorded. Owners were contacted from 1 to 6 years after surgery to determine rehabilitation time, current use of the horse, and overall owner satisfaction with the procedure. Success was determined on the basis of owner satisfaction and outcome for intended use. Variables of interest were compared statistically between horses that underwent surgery for P2 fracture versus other reasons. RESULTS 14 horses underwent surgery for treatment of P2 fracture, and 15 had surgery because of osteoarthritis, subluxation, or osteochondrosis. Median convalescent time after surgery (with no riding or unrestricted exercise) was 7 months. Four horses were euthanized; of 23 known alive at follow-up, 22 were not lame, and 18 had returned to their intended use (8 and 10 at higher and lower owner-reported levels of work, respectively). Horses undergoing arthrodesis for reasons other than fracture were significantly more likely to return to their previous level of work. Twenty-two of 24 owners contacted indicated satisfaction with the procedure. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Surgical arthrodesis of the PIPJ was successful in most horses of the study population. Various nuances of the system for fracture repair need to be understood prior to its use.",
author = "Sakai, {R. Russell} and Goodrich, {Laurie R.} and Katzman, {Scott A} and Moorman, {Valerie J.} and Leise, {Britta S.} and Kawcak, {Christopher E.} and Galuppo, {Larry D}",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2460/javma.253.11.1460",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "253",
pages = "1460--1466",
journal = "Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association",
issn = "0003-1488",
publisher = "American Veterinary Medical Association",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Use of a locking compression plate for equine proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis

T2 - 29 cases (2008-2014)

AU - Sakai, R. Russell

AU - Goodrich, Laurie R.

AU - Katzman, Scott A

AU - Moorman, Valerie J.

AU - Leise, Britta S.

AU - Kawcak, Christopher E.

AU - Galuppo, Larry D

PY - 2018/12/1

Y1 - 2018/12/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE To describe clinical use of a locking compression plate (LCP) for proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ) arthrodesis in horses and compare outcomes for horses that underwent the procedure as treatment for fracture of the middle phalanx (P2) versus other causes. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 29 client-owned horses. PROCEDURES Medical records of 2 veterinary teaching hospitals from 2008 through 2014 were reviewed to identify horses that underwent PIPJ arthrodesis of 1 limb. Signalment, surgical, and outcome-related variables were recorded. Owners were contacted from 1 to 6 years after surgery to determine rehabilitation time, current use of the horse, and overall owner satisfaction with the procedure. Success was determined on the basis of owner satisfaction and outcome for intended use. Variables of interest were compared statistically between horses that underwent surgery for P2 fracture versus other reasons. RESULTS 14 horses underwent surgery for treatment of P2 fracture, and 15 had surgery because of osteoarthritis, subluxation, or osteochondrosis. Median convalescent time after surgery (with no riding or unrestricted exercise) was 7 months. Four horses were euthanized; of 23 known alive at follow-up, 22 were not lame, and 18 had returned to their intended use (8 and 10 at higher and lower owner-reported levels of work, respectively). Horses undergoing arthrodesis for reasons other than fracture were significantly more likely to return to their previous level of work. Twenty-two of 24 owners contacted indicated satisfaction with the procedure. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Surgical arthrodesis of the PIPJ was successful in most horses of the study population. Various nuances of the system for fracture repair need to be understood prior to its use.

AB - OBJECTIVE To describe clinical use of a locking compression plate (LCP) for proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ) arthrodesis in horses and compare outcomes for horses that underwent the procedure as treatment for fracture of the middle phalanx (P2) versus other causes. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 29 client-owned horses. PROCEDURES Medical records of 2 veterinary teaching hospitals from 2008 through 2014 were reviewed to identify horses that underwent PIPJ arthrodesis of 1 limb. Signalment, surgical, and outcome-related variables were recorded. Owners were contacted from 1 to 6 years after surgery to determine rehabilitation time, current use of the horse, and overall owner satisfaction with the procedure. Success was determined on the basis of owner satisfaction and outcome for intended use. Variables of interest were compared statistically between horses that underwent surgery for P2 fracture versus other reasons. RESULTS 14 horses underwent surgery for treatment of P2 fracture, and 15 had surgery because of osteoarthritis, subluxation, or osteochondrosis. Median convalescent time after surgery (with no riding or unrestricted exercise) was 7 months. Four horses were euthanized; of 23 known alive at follow-up, 22 were not lame, and 18 had returned to their intended use (8 and 10 at higher and lower owner-reported levels of work, respectively). Horses undergoing arthrodesis for reasons other than fracture were significantly more likely to return to their previous level of work. Twenty-two of 24 owners contacted indicated satisfaction with the procedure. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Surgical arthrodesis of the PIPJ was successful in most horses of the study population. Various nuances of the system for fracture repair need to be understood prior to its use.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85056732939&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85056732939&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2460/javma.253.11.1460

DO - 10.2460/javma.253.11.1460

M3 - Article

C2 - 30451612

AN - SCOPUS:85056732939

VL - 253

SP - 1460

EP - 1466

JO - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SN - 0003-1488

IS - 11

ER -