Urinary tract infections in meningioma patients: Analysis of risk factors and outcomes

K. Nosova, Miriam A Nuno, D. Mukherjee, S. P. Lad, M. Boakye, K. L. Black, C. G. Patil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) account for about 35% of all nosocomial infections and 75% are associated with the use of urethral catheters. Aim: The goal of this study was to evaluate preoperative factors associated with the risk of UTI and to estimate the impact of UTIs on patient outcome and resource utilization. Methods: Adult meningioma patients treated with craniotomy in US hospitals between 2002 and 2007 were queried from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. Univariate and multivariate analyses that correct for sample survey design data were used to study the association of perioperative UTIs and outcomes. Findings: In all, 46,344 patients were included. Women comprised the majority (70.0%), had lower mortality (1.2% vs 2.0%), shorter in-hospital stay (6.7 vs 7.5 days), lower hospital charges (US$76,682 vs 87,220) and higher UTI rates (6.3% vs 3.9%) than men. In multivariate analysis, female gender (odds ratio: 2.2; P < 0.0001), older age (1.4; P < 0.001), emergency room admissions (1.8; P < 0.0001), total length of stay (1.08; P < 0.0001), comorbidity score (1.04; P = 0.0147), postoperative fluid abnormalities (1.96; P < 0.0001) and pulmonary complications (1.3; P < 0.0011) were associated with UTI. UTI was associated with an additional 2.3 days of hospital stay and an incremental US$18,920 in hospital charges. Conclusions: Perioperative UTIs are associated with specific comorbidities and postoperative complications. They significantly increase in-hospital length of stay and costs. Our data emphasize the need to support national efforts that are underway to reduce hospital-acquired UTIs within the neurosurgical population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)132-139
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
Volume83
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Meningioma
Urinary Tract Infections
Length of Stay
Hospital Charges
Comorbidity
Multivariate Analysis
Urinary Catheters
Hospital Costs
Craniotomy
Cross Infection
Hospital Emergency Service
Inpatients
Odds Ratio
Databases
Lung
Mortality

Keywords

  • Comorbidities
  • Complications
  • Craniotomy
  • Length of stay
  • Meningioma
  • Urinary tract infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Urinary tract infections in meningioma patients : Analysis of risk factors and outcomes. / Nosova, K.; Nuno, Miriam A; Mukherjee, D.; Lad, S. P.; Boakye, M.; Black, K. L.; Patil, C. G.

In: Journal of Hospital Infection, Vol. 83, No. 2, 01.02.2013, p. 132-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nosova, K. ; Nuno, Miriam A ; Mukherjee, D. ; Lad, S. P. ; Boakye, M. ; Black, K. L. ; Patil, C. G. / Urinary tract infections in meningioma patients : Analysis of risk factors and outcomes. In: Journal of Hospital Infection. 2013 ; Vol. 83, No. 2. pp. 132-139.
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abstract = "Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) account for about 35{\%} of all nosocomial infections and 75{\%} are associated with the use of urethral catheters. Aim: The goal of this study was to evaluate preoperative factors associated with the risk of UTI and to estimate the impact of UTIs on patient outcome and resource utilization. Methods: Adult meningioma patients treated with craniotomy in US hospitals between 2002 and 2007 were queried from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. Univariate and multivariate analyses that correct for sample survey design data were used to study the association of perioperative UTIs and outcomes. Findings: In all, 46,344 patients were included. Women comprised the majority (70.0{\%}), had lower mortality (1.2{\%} vs 2.0{\%}), shorter in-hospital stay (6.7 vs 7.5 days), lower hospital charges (US$76,682 vs 87,220) and higher UTI rates (6.3{\%} vs 3.9{\%}) than men. In multivariate analysis, female gender (odds ratio: 2.2; P < 0.0001), older age (1.4; P < 0.001), emergency room admissions (1.8; P < 0.0001), total length of stay (1.08; P < 0.0001), comorbidity score (1.04; P = 0.0147), postoperative fluid abnormalities (1.96; P < 0.0001) and pulmonary complications (1.3; P < 0.0011) were associated with UTI. UTI was associated with an additional 2.3 days of hospital stay and an incremental US$18,920 in hospital charges. Conclusions: Perioperative UTIs are associated with specific comorbidities and postoperative complications. They significantly increase in-hospital length of stay and costs. Our data emphasize the need to support national efforts that are underway to reduce hospital-acquired UTIs within the neurosurgical population.",
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AU - Lad, S. P.

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AU - Black, K. L.

AU - Patil, C. G.

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