Unsuspected diversity among marine aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs

Oded Béjà, Marcelino T. Suzuki, John F. Heidelberg, William C. Nelson, Christina M. Preston, Tohru Hamada, Jonathan A Eisen, Claire M. Fraser, Edward F. DeLong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

305 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aerobic, anoxygenic, phototrophic bacteria containing bacteriochlorophyll a (Bchla) require oxygen for both growth and Bchla synthesis. Recent reports suggest that these bacteria are widely distributed in marine plankton, and that they may account for up to 5% of surface ocean photosynthetic electron transport and 11% of the total microbial community. Known planktonic anoxygenic phototrophs belong to only a few restricted groups within the Proteobacteria α-subclass. Here we report genomic analyses of the photosynthetic gene content and operon organization in naturally occurring marine bacteria. These photosynthetic gene clusters included some that most closely resembled those of Proteobacteria from the β-subclass, which have never before been observed in marine environments. Furthermore, these photosynthetic genes were broadly distributed in marine plankton, and actively expressed in neritic bacterioplankton assemblages, indicating that the newly identified phototrophs were photosynthetically competent. Our data demonstrate that planktonic bacterial assemblages are not simply composed of one uniform, widespread class of anoxygenic phototrophs, as previously proposed; rather, these assemblages contain multiple, distantly related, photosynthetically active bacterial groups, including some unrelated to known and cultivated types.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)630-633
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume415
Issue number6872
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 7 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Plankton
Bacteriochlorophylls
Proteobacteria
Bacteria
Operon
Multigene Family
Electron Transport
Oceans and Seas
Genes
Oxygen
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Béjà, O., Suzuki, M. T., Heidelberg, J. F., Nelson, W. C., Preston, C. M., Hamada, T., ... DeLong, E. F. (2002). Unsuspected diversity among marine aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs. Nature, 415(6872), 630-633. https://doi.org/10.1038/415630a

Unsuspected diversity among marine aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs. / Béjà, Oded; Suzuki, Marcelino T.; Heidelberg, John F.; Nelson, William C.; Preston, Christina M.; Hamada, Tohru; Eisen, Jonathan A; Fraser, Claire M.; DeLong, Edward F.

In: Nature, Vol. 415, No. 6872, 07.02.2002, p. 630-633.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Béjà, O, Suzuki, MT, Heidelberg, JF, Nelson, WC, Preston, CM, Hamada, T, Eisen, JA, Fraser, CM & DeLong, EF 2002, 'Unsuspected diversity among marine aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs', Nature, vol. 415, no. 6872, pp. 630-633. https://doi.org/10.1038/415630a
Béjà O, Suzuki MT, Heidelberg JF, Nelson WC, Preston CM, Hamada T et al. Unsuspected diversity among marine aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs. Nature. 2002 Feb 7;415(6872):630-633. https://doi.org/10.1038/415630a
Béjà, Oded ; Suzuki, Marcelino T. ; Heidelberg, John F. ; Nelson, William C. ; Preston, Christina M. ; Hamada, Tohru ; Eisen, Jonathan A ; Fraser, Claire M. ; DeLong, Edward F. / Unsuspected diversity among marine aerobic anoxygenic phototrophs. In: Nature. 2002 ; Vol. 415, No. 6872. pp. 630-633.
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