Ultrastructure and growth factor content of equine platelet-rich fibrin gels

Jamie A. Textor, Kaitlin C. Murphy, Jonathan K Leach, Fern Tablin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective-To compare fiber diameter, pore area, compressive stiffness, gelation properties, and selected growth factor content of platelet-rich fibrin gels (PRFGs) and conventional fibrin gels (FGs). Sample-PRFGs and conventional FGs prepared from the blood of 10 healthy horses. Procedures-Autologous fibrinogen was used to form conventional FGs. The PRFGs were formed from autologous platelet-rich plasma of various platelet concentrations (100 × 103 platelets/μL, 250 × 103 platelets/μL, 500 × 103 platelets/μL, and 1,000 × 103 platelets/μL. All gels contained an identical fibrinogen concentration (20 mg/mL). Fiber diameter and pore area were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. Maximum gelation rate was assessed with spectrophotometry, and gel stiffness was determined by measuring the compressive modulus. Gel weights were measured serially over 14 days as an index of contraction (volume loss). Platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor-β1 concentrations were quantified with ELISAs. Results-Fiber diameters were significantly larger and mean pore areas were significantly smaller in PRFGs than in conventional FGs. Gel weight decreased significantly over time, differed significantly between PRFGs and conventional FGs, and was significantly correlated with platelet concentration. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor β1 concentrations were highest in gels and releasates derived from 1,000 × 103 platelets/μL. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-The inclusion of platelets in FGs altered the architecture and increased the growth factor content of the resulting scaffold. Platelets may represent a useful means of modifying these gels for applications in veterinary and human regenerative medicine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)392-401
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume75
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

fibrin
Fibrin
growth factors
Horses
ultrastructure
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Blood Platelets
Gels
gels
horses
platelet-derived growth factor
transforming growth factors
fibrinogen
Transforming Growth Factors
gelation
Fibrinogen
Weights and Measures
Platelet-Rich Plasma
Regenerative Medicine
Spectrophotometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Ultrastructure and growth factor content of equine platelet-rich fibrin gels. / Textor, Jamie A.; Murphy, Kaitlin C.; Leach, Jonathan K; Tablin, Fern.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 75, No. 4, 2014, p. 392-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Textor, Jamie A. ; Murphy, Kaitlin C. ; Leach, Jonathan K ; Tablin, Fern. / Ultrastructure and growth factor content of equine platelet-rich fibrin gels. In: American Journal of Veterinary Research. 2014 ; Vol. 75, No. 4. pp. 392-401.
@article{e14c14bf010a4f67ba5b2e3c4b01f4bc,
title = "Ultrastructure and growth factor content of equine platelet-rich fibrin gels",
abstract = "Objective-To compare fiber diameter, pore area, compressive stiffness, gelation properties, and selected growth factor content of platelet-rich fibrin gels (PRFGs) and conventional fibrin gels (FGs). Sample-PRFGs and conventional FGs prepared from the blood of 10 healthy horses. Procedures-Autologous fibrinogen was used to form conventional FGs. The PRFGs were formed from autologous platelet-rich plasma of various platelet concentrations (100 × 103 platelets/μL, 250 × 103 platelets/μL, 500 × 103 platelets/μL, and 1,000 × 103 platelets/μL. All gels contained an identical fibrinogen concentration (20 mg/mL). Fiber diameter and pore area were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. Maximum gelation rate was assessed with spectrophotometry, and gel stiffness was determined by measuring the compressive modulus. Gel weights were measured serially over 14 days as an index of contraction (volume loss). Platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor-β1 concentrations were quantified with ELISAs. Results-Fiber diameters were significantly larger and mean pore areas were significantly smaller in PRFGs than in conventional FGs. Gel weight decreased significantly over time, differed significantly between PRFGs and conventional FGs, and was significantly correlated with platelet concentration. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor β1 concentrations were highest in gels and releasates derived from 1,000 × 103 platelets/μL. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-The inclusion of platelets in FGs altered the architecture and increased the growth factor content of the resulting scaffold. Platelets may represent a useful means of modifying these gels for applications in veterinary and human regenerative medicine.",
author = "Textor, {Jamie A.} and Murphy, {Kaitlin C.} and Leach, {Jonathan K} and Fern Tablin",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.2460/ajvr.75.4.392",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "75",
pages = "392--401",
journal = "American Journal of Veterinary Research",
issn = "0002-9645",
publisher = "American Veterinary Medical Association",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ultrastructure and growth factor content of equine platelet-rich fibrin gels

AU - Textor, Jamie A.

AU - Murphy, Kaitlin C.

AU - Leach, Jonathan K

AU - Tablin, Fern

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Objective-To compare fiber diameter, pore area, compressive stiffness, gelation properties, and selected growth factor content of platelet-rich fibrin gels (PRFGs) and conventional fibrin gels (FGs). Sample-PRFGs and conventional FGs prepared from the blood of 10 healthy horses. Procedures-Autologous fibrinogen was used to form conventional FGs. The PRFGs were formed from autologous platelet-rich plasma of various platelet concentrations (100 × 103 platelets/μL, 250 × 103 platelets/μL, 500 × 103 platelets/μL, and 1,000 × 103 platelets/μL. All gels contained an identical fibrinogen concentration (20 mg/mL). Fiber diameter and pore area were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. Maximum gelation rate was assessed with spectrophotometry, and gel stiffness was determined by measuring the compressive modulus. Gel weights were measured serially over 14 days as an index of contraction (volume loss). Platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor-β1 concentrations were quantified with ELISAs. Results-Fiber diameters were significantly larger and mean pore areas were significantly smaller in PRFGs than in conventional FGs. Gel weight decreased significantly over time, differed significantly between PRFGs and conventional FGs, and was significantly correlated with platelet concentration. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor β1 concentrations were highest in gels and releasates derived from 1,000 × 103 platelets/μL. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-The inclusion of platelets in FGs altered the architecture and increased the growth factor content of the resulting scaffold. Platelets may represent a useful means of modifying these gels for applications in veterinary and human regenerative medicine.

AB - Objective-To compare fiber diameter, pore area, compressive stiffness, gelation properties, and selected growth factor content of platelet-rich fibrin gels (PRFGs) and conventional fibrin gels (FGs). Sample-PRFGs and conventional FGs prepared from the blood of 10 healthy horses. Procedures-Autologous fibrinogen was used to form conventional FGs. The PRFGs were formed from autologous platelet-rich plasma of various platelet concentrations (100 × 103 platelets/μL, 250 × 103 platelets/μL, 500 × 103 platelets/μL, and 1,000 × 103 platelets/μL. All gels contained an identical fibrinogen concentration (20 mg/mL). Fiber diameter and pore area were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. Maximum gelation rate was assessed with spectrophotometry, and gel stiffness was determined by measuring the compressive modulus. Gel weights were measured serially over 14 days as an index of contraction (volume loss). Platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor-β1 concentrations were quantified with ELISAs. Results-Fiber diameters were significantly larger and mean pore areas were significantly smaller in PRFGs than in conventional FGs. Gel weight decreased significantly over time, differed significantly between PRFGs and conventional FGs, and was significantly correlated with platelet concentration. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor β1 concentrations were highest in gels and releasates derived from 1,000 × 103 platelets/μL. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-The inclusion of platelets in FGs altered the architecture and increased the growth factor content of the resulting scaffold. Platelets may represent a useful means of modifying these gels for applications in veterinary and human regenerative medicine.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84897042789&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84897042789&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2460/ajvr.75.4.392

DO - 10.2460/ajvr.75.4.392

M3 - Article

C2 - 24669926

AN - SCOPUS:84897042789

VL - 75

SP - 392

EP - 401

JO - American Journal of Veterinary Research

JF - American Journal of Veterinary Research

SN - 0002-9645

IS - 4

ER -