Tumorigenicity of human malignant lymphoblasts: Comparative study with unmanipulated nude mice, antilymphocyte serum-treated nude mice, and X-irradiated nude mice

Y. Ohsugi, M. Eric Gershwin, R. B. Owens, W. A. Nelson-Rees

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability of unmanipulated, antilymphocyte serum (ALS)-treated, and X-irradiated nude BALB/c female mice (in their 13th backcross generation) to serve as hosts for 10 human lymphoblastoid cell lines as well as for peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy humans was compared. The 10 lymphoma lines included 7 previously characterized and reported in the literature. Significant differences with respect to both latency period for tumor appearance and success rate for tumor transplantation were detected among the 3 experimental groups. The unmanipulated mice were poor recipients for lymphoma heterotransplants, and tumors were produced in only two instances. In contrast, 6 tumor lines were successfully transplanted in mice inoculated with ALS, and all 10 lines were successfully transplanted in X-irradiated recipients. Although tumors were readily produced in ALS-treated and X-irradiated mice, no gross or histological evidence of local or distant metastases was apparent. Human lymphoblastoid cells were recultured, essentially unchanged, from the heterotransplants from 6 of 7 tumors tested. Although the tumor line HT 1460, originally from a human lymphoma, was successfully transplanted in all 3 groups, only mouse cells were recultured. The use of X-radiation, rather than ALS, to immunosuppress nude mice offers a more standardized method for heterotransplanting human tumor cell lines and permits ready comparisons between laboratories. Furthermore, X-radiation permits transplantation and subsequent study of lymphoblastoid tumors that are otherwise difficult to successfully transplant in nude mice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)715-718
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume65
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1980

Fingerprint

Antilymphocyte Serum
Nude Mice
Neoplasms
Lymphoma
Heterografts
Transplantation
X-Rays
Tumor Cell Line
Lymphocytes
Neoplasm Metastasis
Transplants
Cell Line

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

@article{7108d23fd130478fb679e9c988025b5c,
title = "Tumorigenicity of human malignant lymphoblasts: Comparative study with unmanipulated nude mice, antilymphocyte serum-treated nude mice, and X-irradiated nude mice",
abstract = "The ability of unmanipulated, antilymphocyte serum (ALS)-treated, and X-irradiated nude BALB/c female mice (in their 13th backcross generation) to serve as hosts for 10 human lymphoblastoid cell lines as well as for peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy humans was compared. The 10 lymphoma lines included 7 previously characterized and reported in the literature. Significant differences with respect to both latency period for tumor appearance and success rate for tumor transplantation were detected among the 3 experimental groups. The unmanipulated mice were poor recipients for lymphoma heterotransplants, and tumors were produced in only two instances. In contrast, 6 tumor lines were successfully transplanted in mice inoculated with ALS, and all 10 lines were successfully transplanted in X-irradiated recipients. Although tumors were readily produced in ALS-treated and X-irradiated mice, no gross or histological evidence of local or distant metastases was apparent. Human lymphoblastoid cells were recultured, essentially unchanged, from the heterotransplants from 6 of 7 tumors tested. Although the tumor line HT 1460, originally from a human lymphoma, was successfully transplanted in all 3 groups, only mouse cells were recultured. The use of X-radiation, rather than ALS, to immunosuppress nude mice offers a more standardized method for heterotransplanting human tumor cell lines and permits ready comparisons between laboratories. Furthermore, X-radiation permits transplantation and subsequent study of lymphoblastoid tumors that are otherwise difficult to successfully transplant in nude mice.",
author = "Y. Ohsugi and Gershwin, {M. Eric} and Owens, {R. B.} and Nelson-Rees, {W. A.}",
year = "1980",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "65",
pages = "715--718",
journal = "Journal of the National Cancer Institute",
issn = "0027-8874",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tumorigenicity of human malignant lymphoblasts

T2 - Comparative study with unmanipulated nude mice, antilymphocyte serum-treated nude mice, and X-irradiated nude mice

AU - Ohsugi, Y.

AU - Gershwin, M. Eric

AU - Owens, R. B.

AU - Nelson-Rees, W. A.

PY - 1980

Y1 - 1980

N2 - The ability of unmanipulated, antilymphocyte serum (ALS)-treated, and X-irradiated nude BALB/c female mice (in their 13th backcross generation) to serve as hosts for 10 human lymphoblastoid cell lines as well as for peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy humans was compared. The 10 lymphoma lines included 7 previously characterized and reported in the literature. Significant differences with respect to both latency period for tumor appearance and success rate for tumor transplantation were detected among the 3 experimental groups. The unmanipulated mice were poor recipients for lymphoma heterotransplants, and tumors were produced in only two instances. In contrast, 6 tumor lines were successfully transplanted in mice inoculated with ALS, and all 10 lines were successfully transplanted in X-irradiated recipients. Although tumors were readily produced in ALS-treated and X-irradiated mice, no gross or histological evidence of local or distant metastases was apparent. Human lymphoblastoid cells were recultured, essentially unchanged, from the heterotransplants from 6 of 7 tumors tested. Although the tumor line HT 1460, originally from a human lymphoma, was successfully transplanted in all 3 groups, only mouse cells were recultured. The use of X-radiation, rather than ALS, to immunosuppress nude mice offers a more standardized method for heterotransplanting human tumor cell lines and permits ready comparisons between laboratories. Furthermore, X-radiation permits transplantation and subsequent study of lymphoblastoid tumors that are otherwise difficult to successfully transplant in nude mice.

AB - The ability of unmanipulated, antilymphocyte serum (ALS)-treated, and X-irradiated nude BALB/c female mice (in their 13th backcross generation) to serve as hosts for 10 human lymphoblastoid cell lines as well as for peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy humans was compared. The 10 lymphoma lines included 7 previously characterized and reported in the literature. Significant differences with respect to both latency period for tumor appearance and success rate for tumor transplantation were detected among the 3 experimental groups. The unmanipulated mice were poor recipients for lymphoma heterotransplants, and tumors were produced in only two instances. In contrast, 6 tumor lines were successfully transplanted in mice inoculated with ALS, and all 10 lines were successfully transplanted in X-irradiated recipients. Although tumors were readily produced in ALS-treated and X-irradiated mice, no gross or histological evidence of local or distant metastases was apparent. Human lymphoblastoid cells were recultured, essentially unchanged, from the heterotransplants from 6 of 7 tumors tested. Although the tumor line HT 1460, originally from a human lymphoma, was successfully transplanted in all 3 groups, only mouse cells were recultured. The use of X-radiation, rather than ALS, to immunosuppress nude mice offers a more standardized method for heterotransplanting human tumor cell lines and permits ready comparisons between laboratories. Furthermore, X-radiation permits transplantation and subsequent study of lymphoblastoid tumors that are otherwise difficult to successfully transplant in nude mice.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0018854134&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0018854134&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 6932523

AN - SCOPUS:0018854134

VL - 65

SP - 715

EP - 718

JO - Journal of the National Cancer Institute

JF - Journal of the National Cancer Institute

SN - 0027-8874

IS - 4

ER -