Trigeminal nerve section induces Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) in brainstem and decreases FLI in sensory cortex

Frank R Sharp, Julie Griffith, Manuel F. Gonzalez, Stephen M. Sagar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transecting the infraorbital nerve to the rat whiskers induced Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) in lamina I and II neuronal nuclei of the spinal trigeminal nucleus pars caudalis (Sp5c). The Fos-like immunostaining persisted for several weeks. The prolonged expression of FLI in Sp5c could be related to persistent activity in the sectioned nerve, or to trophic effects of injured ganglion neurons on brainstem cells. We postulate that Fos and related proteins may be involved in mediating alterations in gene expression associated with relatively long-term CNS adaptations to peripheral nerve injuries. Surprisingly, FLI decreased in contralateral sensory cortex, mainly in layers 2, 3 and 6, up to several days after the lesion. These decreases of cortical FLI may be due to decreased sensory neuronal activity, and/or to reducing the trophic influence of thalamic inputs on cortical neurons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)217-220
Number of pages4
JournalMolecular Brain Research
Volume6
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Trigeminal Nerve
Brain Stem
Substantia Gelatinosa
Spinal Trigeminal Nucleus
Neurons
Vibrissae
Peripheral Nerve Injuries
Ganglia
Gene Expression
Proteins
Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn

Keywords

  • Barrel
  • c-Fos
  • Protooncogene
  • Trigeminal injury
  • Whisker

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Trigeminal nerve section induces Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) in brainstem and decreases FLI in sensory cortex. / Sharp, Frank R; Griffith, Julie; Gonzalez, Manuel F.; Sagar, Stephen M.

In: Molecular Brain Research, Vol. 6, No. 2-3, 1989, p. 217-220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharp, Frank R ; Griffith, Julie ; Gonzalez, Manuel F. ; Sagar, Stephen M. / Trigeminal nerve section induces Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) in brainstem and decreases FLI in sensory cortex. In: Molecular Brain Research. 1989 ; Vol. 6, No. 2-3. pp. 217-220.
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