Treatment of Temporal Bone Fractures

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Traumatic injury to the temporal bone can lead to significant morbidity or mortality and knowledge of the pertinent anatomy, pathophysiology of injury, and appropriate management strategies is critical for successful recovery and rehabilitation of such injured patients. Most temporal bone fractures are caused by motor vehicle accidents. Temporal bone fractures are best classified as either otic capsule sparing or otic capsule disrupting-type fractures, as such classification correlates well with risk of concomitant functional complications. The most common complications of temporal bone fractures are facial nerve injury, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, and hearing loss. Assessment of facial nerve function as soon as possible following injury greatly facilitates clinical decision making. Use of prophylactic antibiotics in the setting of CSF leak is controversial; however, following critical analysis and interpretation of the existing classic and contemporary literature, we believe its use is absolutely warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-429
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neurological Surgery, Part B: Skull Base
Volume77
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Keywords

  • cerebrospinal fluid leak
  • cholesteatoma
  • conductive hearing loss
  • facial nerve decompression
  • facial nerve paralysis
  • ossicular chain disruption
  • otic capsule disrupting
  • otic capsule sparing
  • sensorineural hearing loss
  • temporal bone fracture
  • vertigo

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Treatment of Temporal Bone Fractures'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this