Treatment of a Facial Myxoma in a Goldfish (Carassius auratus) With Intralesional Bleomycin Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

Brittany N. Stevens, Claire Vergneau-Grosset, Carlos O. Rodriguez, Katherine S Hansen, Cassandra Wilcox, Sara M. Gardhouse, Sarah Bahan, Dayna A. Goldsmith, Esteban Soto Martinez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A 4.5-year-old Ranchu goldfish (Carassius auratus) was presented for evaluation of a slowly growing facial mass of 6 months' duration. The mass, identified histologically as a myxoma, was noted to be protruding into the oral cavity and causing exophthalmia of the left eye. Two intralesional chemotherapeutic treatments of 2.5. U/kg bleomycin were performed 14 weeks apart. Reported side effects consisted of mild lethargy noted for 2 days following the second administration. Four weeks following the initial bleomycin administration, the owner appreciated a reduction in tumor size of 60%, however tumor expansion was occurring 11 weeks following administration. Following the second administration, only 20% to 30% tumor reduction was noted and a shorter response interval of 8 to 9 weeks was noted. Two treatments with 8 Gray (Gy) fractions of megavoltage radiation were subsequently performed 4 weeks apart. The owner reported no adverse effects following treatment. However, this dosing regime was not effective at preventing tumor growth. The owner elected to euthanize the patient 23 days following the final radiation session representing a treatment interval of 8 months after initial diagnosis. Although these treatment modalities were not successful for disease remission, they remain potentially useful treatment options for improving the quality of life in teleost patients diagnosed with myxoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Exotic Pet Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Goldfish
Myxoma
Carassius auratus
goldfish
Bleomycin
radiotherapy
drug therapy
Radiotherapy
Drug Therapy
neoplasms
adverse effects
Neoplasms
remission
Therapeutics
quality of life
Radiation
mouth
Lethargy
eyes
duration

Keywords

  • Bleomycin
  • Carassius auratus
  • Chemotherapy
  • Goldfish
  • Myxoma
  • Radiation therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Treatment of a Facial Myxoma in a Goldfish (Carassius auratus) With Intralesional Bleomycin Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy. / Stevens, Brittany N.; Vergneau-Grosset, Claire; Rodriguez, Carlos O.; Hansen, Katherine S; Wilcox, Cassandra; Gardhouse, Sara M.; Bahan, Sarah; Goldsmith, Dayna A.; Soto Martinez, Esteban.

In: Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stevens, Brittany N. ; Vergneau-Grosset, Claire ; Rodriguez, Carlos O. ; Hansen, Katherine S ; Wilcox, Cassandra ; Gardhouse, Sara M. ; Bahan, Sarah ; Goldsmith, Dayna A. ; Soto Martinez, Esteban. / Treatment of a Facial Myxoma in a Goldfish (Carassius auratus) With Intralesional Bleomycin Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy. In: Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine. 2017.
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