Treatment disparities in hispanic rectal cancer patients: A SEER database study

Steve R. Martinez, Steven L. Chen, Anton J. Bilchik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although Hispanics demonstrate a low overall incidence of rectal cancer, mortality rates have not decreased relative to non-Hispanic whites. To determine if this was in part due to racial disparities in care, we compared rates of neoadjuvant therapy and sphincter-preserving surgery between Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites diagnosed with rectal cancer using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The study population was comprised of 2,573 Hispanics (55.4% male) and 28,395 non-Hispanic whites (56.6% male). Rates of neoadjuvant radiation were 13.5 per cent for Hispanics compared with 10.4 per cent for non-Hispanic whites (P < 0.001). In a Cox proportional hazards model adjusting for nodal status, tumor size, and T stage, non-Hispanic whites were significantly less likely to have received neoadjuvant therapy (hazard ratio, 0.72; P < 0.001; 95% confidence interval 0.63-0.83). Rates of sphincter preservation were 67 per cent for Hispanics and 70 per cent for non-Hispanic whites (P = 0.003). Non-Hispanic whites were significantly more likely to have received a sphincter-preserving operation than Hispanics (hazard ratio, 1.076; P = 0.019; 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.27). We conclude that Hispanics are significantly more likely to receive neoadjuvant therapy but are less likely to receive sphincter-sparing operations for rectal cancer compared with non-Hispanic whites. Further studies are required to assess the impact of these treatment disparities on patient outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)906-908
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume72
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Rectal Neoplasms
Hispanic Americans
Epidemiology
Databases
Neoadjuvant Therapy
Therapeutics
Confidence Intervals
Proportional Hazards Models
Radiation
Mortality
Incidence
Population
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Martinez, S. R., Chen, S. L., & Bilchik, A. J. (2006). Treatment disparities in hispanic rectal cancer patients: A SEER database study. American Surgeon, 72(10), 906-908.

Treatment disparities in hispanic rectal cancer patients : A SEER database study. / Martinez, Steve R.; Chen, Steven L.; Bilchik, Anton J.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 72, No. 10, 10.2006, p. 906-908.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martinez, SR, Chen, SL & Bilchik, AJ 2006, 'Treatment disparities in hispanic rectal cancer patients: A SEER database study', American Surgeon, vol. 72, no. 10, pp. 906-908.
Martinez, Steve R. ; Chen, Steven L. ; Bilchik, Anton J. / Treatment disparities in hispanic rectal cancer patients : A SEER database study. In: American Surgeon. 2006 ; Vol. 72, No. 10. pp. 906-908.
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