Treating Social Anxiety Disorder with CBT: Impact on Emotion Regulation and Satisfaction with Life

Hooria Jazaieri, Philip R Goldin, James J. Gross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined whether cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) would influence the relationship between two distinct forms of emotion regulation (cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression) and satisfaction with life in patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD). When compared to healthy adults (n = 42) at baseline (Study 1), patients with SAD (n = 128) reported lesser use of cognitive reappraisal, greater use of expressive suppression, and lower levels of satisfaction with life. In a randomized controlled trial of CBT (n = 40) versus a waitlist control group (n = 32) (Study 2), resulted indicated in the CBT group significant group by time interactions for the use of cognitive reappraisal and satisfaction with life, but not for the use of expressive suppression. Regression analyses in Study 2 provide insight into the predictive value of expressive suppression emotion regulation on post-CBT life satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)406-416
Number of pages11
JournalCognitive Therapy and Research
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Cognitive Therapy
Emotions
Randomized Controlled Trials
Regression Analysis
Control Groups
Social Phobia

Keywords

  • CBT
  • Cognitive reappraisal
  • Emotion regulation
  • Expressive suppression
  • Satisfaction with life
  • Social anxiety disorder
  • Subjective well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Treating Social Anxiety Disorder with CBT : Impact on Emotion Regulation and Satisfaction with Life. / Jazaieri, Hooria; Goldin, Philip R; Gross, James J.

In: Cognitive Therapy and Research, Vol. 41, No. 3, 01.06.2017, p. 406-416.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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