Traditional approaches to androgen deprivation therapy

Judd W. Moul, Christopher P Evans, Leonard G. Gomella, MacK Roach, Robert Dreicer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For most of the past 25 years, 1 of the favored approaches to treating prostate cancer has been the suppression of circulating testosterone with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists. LHRH agonists produce a downregulation of LHRH receptors and an uncoupling of the LHRH signal transduction mechanism. This leads to a marked reduction in the secretion of bioactive hormones stimulating testosterone production and eventual induction of a reversible, but transient and incomplete, state known as "selective medical hypophysectomy." The treatment with LHRH agonists has proved effective in many settings; however, the dosage and timing strategies depend critically on the patient's disease risk and progression. More recent investigations have suggested that a newer, quicker acting, pure gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist might be a preferable treatment approach. It remains a fundamental truth, however, that hormonal therapy is both overused and more toxic than generally appreciated. Therefore, a complete understanding of the indications and applications of this approach is essential for the practice of evidence-based medicine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalUrology
Volume78
Issue number5 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

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Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
Androgens
Testosterone
LHRH Receptors
Hormone Antagonists
Therapeutics
Hypophysectomy
Poisons
Evidence-Based Medicine
Disease Progression
Signal Transduction
Prostatic Neoplasms
Down-Regulation
Hormones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Moul, J. W., Evans, C. P., Gomella, L. G., Roach, M., & Dreicer, R. (2011). Traditional approaches to androgen deprivation therapy. Urology, 78(5 SUPPL.). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2011.05.051

Traditional approaches to androgen deprivation therapy. / Moul, Judd W.; Evans, Christopher P; Gomella, Leonard G.; Roach, MacK; Dreicer, Robert.

In: Urology, Vol. 78, No. 5 SUPPL., 11.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moul, JW, Evans, CP, Gomella, LG, Roach, M & Dreicer, R 2011, 'Traditional approaches to androgen deprivation therapy', Urology, vol. 78, no. 5 SUPPL.. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2011.05.051
Moul, Judd W. ; Evans, Christopher P ; Gomella, Leonard G. ; Roach, MacK ; Dreicer, Robert. / Traditional approaches to androgen deprivation therapy. In: Urology. 2011 ; Vol. 78, No. 5 SUPPL.
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