TP53 Mutations in Canine Brain Tumors

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The p53 tumor suppressor gene (TP53) is the most frequently altered gene in human cancer. Mutation of the gene has been shown to be an important mechanism of p53 pathway inactivation in a variety of human brain tumors, particularly those of astrocytic origin. Genomic DNA from a series of 37 glial and 51 nonglial canine brain tumors was sequenced to determine the frequency of TP53 gene mutations involving exons 3-9. Exonic mutations were found in 3 of 88 tumors (3.4%) and specifically in 1 of 18 astrocytic tumors (5.5%). This is markedly lower than that reported in comparable human tumors, suggesting that alternative mechanisms of p53 inactivation are likely to be present if p53 function contributes significantly to oncogenesis in canine brain tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)796-801
Number of pages6
JournalVeterinary Pathology
Volume49
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Fingerprint

Brain Neoplasms
Canidae
mutation
brain
Mutation
neoplasms
dogs
Neoplasms
p53 Genes
Tumor Suppressor Genes
Neuroglia
inactivation
Genes
Exons
Carcinogenesis
tumor suppressor genes
neuroglia
DNA
carcinogenesis
exons

Keywords

  • cancer genes
  • dog
  • gDNA
  • nervous system
  • oncology
  • polymerase chain reaction
  • sequencing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

TP53 Mutations in Canine Brain Tumors. / York, Daniel; Higgins, Robert; Lecouteur, Richard A; Wolfe, A. N.; Grahn, Robert A; Olby, N.; Campbell, M.; Dickinson, Peter J.

In: Veterinary Pathology, Vol. 49, No. 5, 09.2012, p. 796-801.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Campbell, M.

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