Towards biomarker-dependent individualized chemotherapy: Exploring cell-specific differences in oxaliplatin-DNA adduct distribution using accelerator mass spectrometry

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Abstract

Oxaliplatin is a third-generation platinum-based anticancer drug that is currently used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Oxaliplatin, like other platinum-based anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and carboplatin, is known to induce apoptosis in tumor cells by binding to nuclear DNA, forming monoadducts, and intra- and interstrand diadducts. Previously, we reported an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) assay to measure the kinetics of oxaliplatin-induced DNA damage and repair [Hah, S. S.; Sumbad, R. A.; de Vere White, R. W.; Turteltaub, K. W.; Henderson, P. T. Chem. Res. Toxicol. 2007, 20, 1745]. Here, we describe another application of AMS to the measurement of oxaliplatin-DNA adduct distribution in cultured platinum-sensitive testicular (833 K) and platinum-resistant breast (MDA-MB-231) cancer cells, which resulted in elucidation of cell-dependent differentiation of oxaliplatin-DNA adduct formation, implying that differential adduction and/or accumulation of the drug in cellular DNA may be responsible for the sensitivity of cancer cells to platinum treatment. Ultimately, we hope to use this method to measure the intrinsic platinated DNA adduct repair capacity in cancer patients for use as a biomarker for diagnostics or a predictor of patient outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2448-2451
Number of pages4
JournalBioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters
Volume20
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

oxaliplatin
Chemotherapy
DNA Adducts
Biomarkers
Platinum
Particle accelerators
Mass spectrometry
Mass Spectrometry
Drug Therapy
Cells
DNA Repair
DNA
Neoplasms
Repair
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Carboplatin
Cisplatin
DNA Damage
Tumors
Cell Differentiation

Keywords

  • Accelerator mass spectrometry
  • DNA adduct
  • Oxaliplatin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Drug Discovery
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

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abstract = "Oxaliplatin is a third-generation platinum-based anticancer drug that is currently used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Oxaliplatin, like other platinum-based anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and carboplatin, is known to induce apoptosis in tumor cells by binding to nuclear DNA, forming monoadducts, and intra- and interstrand diadducts. Previously, we reported an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) assay to measure the kinetics of oxaliplatin-induced DNA damage and repair [Hah, S. S.; Sumbad, R. A.; de Vere White, R. W.; Turteltaub, K. W.; Henderson, P. T. Chem. Res. Toxicol. 2007, 20, 1745]. Here, we describe another application of AMS to the measurement of oxaliplatin-DNA adduct distribution in cultured platinum-sensitive testicular (833 K) and platinum-resistant breast (MDA-MB-231) cancer cells, which resulted in elucidation of cell-dependent differentiation of oxaliplatin-DNA adduct formation, implying that differential adduction and/or accumulation of the drug in cellular DNA may be responsible for the sensitivity of cancer cells to platinum treatment. Ultimately, we hope to use this method to measure the intrinsic platinated DNA adduct repair capacity in cancer patients for use as a biomarker for diagnostics or a predictor of patient outcome.",
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AU - Henderson, Paul

AU - Turteltaub, Ken W

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N2 - Oxaliplatin is a third-generation platinum-based anticancer drug that is currently used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Oxaliplatin, like other platinum-based anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and carboplatin, is known to induce apoptosis in tumor cells by binding to nuclear DNA, forming monoadducts, and intra- and interstrand diadducts. Previously, we reported an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) assay to measure the kinetics of oxaliplatin-induced DNA damage and repair [Hah, S. S.; Sumbad, R. A.; de Vere White, R. W.; Turteltaub, K. W.; Henderson, P. T. Chem. Res. Toxicol. 2007, 20, 1745]. Here, we describe another application of AMS to the measurement of oxaliplatin-DNA adduct distribution in cultured platinum-sensitive testicular (833 K) and platinum-resistant breast (MDA-MB-231) cancer cells, which resulted in elucidation of cell-dependent differentiation of oxaliplatin-DNA adduct formation, implying that differential adduction and/or accumulation of the drug in cellular DNA may be responsible for the sensitivity of cancer cells to platinum treatment. Ultimately, we hope to use this method to measure the intrinsic platinated DNA adduct repair capacity in cancer patients for use as a biomarker for diagnostics or a predictor of patient outcome.

AB - Oxaliplatin is a third-generation platinum-based anticancer drug that is currently used in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Oxaliplatin, like other platinum-based anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and carboplatin, is known to induce apoptosis in tumor cells by binding to nuclear DNA, forming monoadducts, and intra- and interstrand diadducts. Previously, we reported an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) assay to measure the kinetics of oxaliplatin-induced DNA damage and repair [Hah, S. S.; Sumbad, R. A.; de Vere White, R. W.; Turteltaub, K. W.; Henderson, P. T. Chem. Res. Toxicol. 2007, 20, 1745]. Here, we describe another application of AMS to the measurement of oxaliplatin-DNA adduct distribution in cultured platinum-sensitive testicular (833 K) and platinum-resistant breast (MDA-MB-231) cancer cells, which resulted in elucidation of cell-dependent differentiation of oxaliplatin-DNA adduct formation, implying that differential adduction and/or accumulation of the drug in cellular DNA may be responsible for the sensitivity of cancer cells to platinum treatment. Ultimately, we hope to use this method to measure the intrinsic platinated DNA adduct repair capacity in cancer patients for use as a biomarker for diagnostics or a predictor of patient outcome.

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KW - DNA adduct

KW - Oxaliplatin

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