Tobacco-related diseases

Is there a role for antioxidant micronutrient supplementation?

Maret G. Traber, Albert Van Der Vliet, Abraham Z. Reznick, Carroll E Cross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is clear that smoking causes an increase in free radicals, reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNS and ROS, respectively), and that cigarette smoking is associated with increases in the incidence and severity of several diseases including atherosclerosis, cancer, and chronic obstructive lung disease. Although there is still no unequivocal evidence that oxidative stress is a contributor to these diseases or that an increased intake of antioxidant nutrients is beneficial, the observation that smokers have lower circulating levels of some of these nutrients, raises concern. This article discusses the possible links between the observed oxidant-induced damage related to tobacco smoking, effects on cellular mechanisms, and their potential involvement in the causation and enhancement of disease processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-187
Number of pages15
JournalClinics in Chest Medicine
Volume21
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2000

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Micronutrients
Tobacco
Antioxidants
Smoking
Reactive Nitrogen Species
Food
Oxidants
Causality
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Free Radicals
Reactive Oxygen Species
Atherosclerosis
Oxidative Stress
Incidence
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Tobacco-related diseases : Is there a role for antioxidant micronutrient supplementation? / Traber, Maret G.; Van Der Vliet, Albert; Reznick, Abraham Z.; Cross, Carroll E.

In: Clinics in Chest Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 1, 2000, p. 173-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Traber, Maret G. ; Van Der Vliet, Albert ; Reznick, Abraham Z. ; Cross, Carroll E. / Tobacco-related diseases : Is there a role for antioxidant micronutrient supplementation?. In: Clinics in Chest Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 173-187.
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