Tissue temperature measurement and heat transfer mechanisms for inductively powered implantable microsystems

Woohyek Choi, Tingrui Pan, Antonio Baldi, Babak Ziaie

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, we report on the tissue temperature measurement and heat transfer mechanisms for inductively powered microsystems. It is shown that heat transfer from the transmitter coil can be the dominant mechanism in tissue heating for applications that require continuous operation (e.g., neural and visual prosthetics). For long-term operation, this thermal effect shouldn't be overlooked or underestimated for tissue safety. Tissue temperature measurements in open and thermally isolated environments are used to verify the above hypothesis. A high-efficiency class-E transmitter is used as the main power source. Heat is generated within the transmitter coil and is transferred to the tissue by conduction, convection, and radiation. Open-air temperature measurements in fat and muscle tissue show a net increase of 0.8 and 0.7°C respectively. However, thermally isolated sample show a lower temperature increase (fat: 0.6°C, muscle: 0.5°C).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1838-1839
Number of pages2
JournalAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume3
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 2002 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 24th Annual Conference and the 2002 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES / EMBS) - Houston, TX, United States
Duration: Oct 23 2002Oct 26 2002

Fingerprint

Microsystems
Temperature measurement
Hot Temperature
Tissue
Heat transfer
Temperature
Transmitters
Oils and fats
Fats
Muscle
Electric Power Supplies
Muscles
Convection
Heating
Prosthetics
Thermal effects
Radiation
Safety

Keywords

  • Class-E transmitter
  • Heat transfer
  • Implantable device
  • Thermal damage
  • Tissue temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Tissue temperature measurement and heat transfer mechanisms for inductively powered implantable microsystems. / Choi, Woohyek; Pan, Tingrui; Baldi, Antonio; Ziaie, Babak.

In: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings, Vol. 3, 01.12.2002, p. 1838-1839.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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