Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy as a diagnostic instrument in head and neck carcinoma

Jeremy D. Meier, Hongtao Xie, Yang Sun, Yinghua Sun, Nisa Hatami, Brian Poirier, Laura Marcu, D Gregory Farwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objectives of this study were to 1) determine differences in lifetime fluorescence between normal and malignant tissue of the upper aerodigestive tract, and 2) evaluate the potential of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) as a diagnostic instrument for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University-based medical center. Subjects and Methods: Nine patients with suspected HNSCC were included. In the operating room, a nitrogen pulse laser (337 nm, 700-picosecond pulse width) was used to induce tissue autofluorescence of normal tissue and suspected malignant lesions. Spectral intensities and time-domain measurements were obtained and compared with the histopathology at each site. A total of 53 sites were measured. The fluorescence parameters that provided the most discrimination were determined. Results: Differences in spectral intensities allowed for discrimination between malignant and normal tissue. The spectral intensity of malignant tissue was lower than that of normal tissue, and a shift of peak intensity to a longer wavelength was observed in the normalized spectrum of malignant tissue in the range of 360 to approximately 660 nm. Multiple time-resolved fluorescence parameters provided the best diagnostic discrimination between normal tissue and carcinoma, including average lifetimes (i.e., at 390 nm: 1.7 ± 0.06 ns [not significant] for normal and 1.3 ± 0.06 ns for tumor, P = 0.0025) and the second-order Laguerre expansion coefficient (LEC-2) (i.e., at 460 nm: 0.135 ± 0.001 for normal and 0.155 ± 0.007 for tumor, P < 0.05). Conclusion: These findings highlight some of the differences in lifetime fluorescence between normal and malignant tissue. TR-LIFS has potential as a noninvasive diagnostic technique for HNSCC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)838-844
Number of pages7
JournalOtolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume142
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

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Fluorescence Spectrometry
Lasers
Neck
Head
Carcinoma
Fluorescence
Gas Lasers
Operating Rooms
Neoplasms
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy as a diagnostic instrument in head and neck carcinoma. / Meier, Jeremy D.; Xie, Hongtao; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Hatami, Nisa; Poirier, Brian; Marcu, Laura; Farwell, D Gregory.

In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 142, No. 6, 06.2010, p. 838-844.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meier, Jeremy D. ; Xie, Hongtao ; Sun, Yang ; Sun, Yinghua ; Hatami, Nisa ; Poirier, Brian ; Marcu, Laura ; Farwell, D Gregory. / Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy as a diagnostic instrument in head and neck carcinoma. In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. 2010 ; Vol. 142, No. 6. pp. 838-844.
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abstract = "Objective: The objectives of this study were to 1) determine differences in lifetime fluorescence between normal and malignant tissue of the upper aerodigestive tract, and 2) evaluate the potential of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) as a diagnostic instrument for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University-based medical center. Subjects and Methods: Nine patients with suspected HNSCC were included. In the operating room, a nitrogen pulse laser (337 nm, 700-picosecond pulse width) was used to induce tissue autofluorescence of normal tissue and suspected malignant lesions. Spectral intensities and time-domain measurements were obtained and compared with the histopathology at each site. A total of 53 sites were measured. The fluorescence parameters that provided the most discrimination were determined. Results: Differences in spectral intensities allowed for discrimination between malignant and normal tissue. The spectral intensity of malignant tissue was lower than that of normal tissue, and a shift of peak intensity to a longer wavelength was observed in the normalized spectrum of malignant tissue in the range of 360 to approximately 660 nm. Multiple time-resolved fluorescence parameters provided the best diagnostic discrimination between normal tissue and carcinoma, including average lifetimes (i.e., at 390 nm: 1.7 ± 0.06 ns [not significant] for normal and 1.3 ± 0.06 ns for tumor, P = 0.0025) and the second-order Laguerre expansion coefficient (LEC-2) (i.e., at 460 nm: 0.135 ± 0.001 for normal and 0.155 ± 0.007 for tumor, P < 0.05). Conclusion: These findings highlight some of the differences in lifetime fluorescence between normal and malignant tissue. TR-LIFS has potential as a noninvasive diagnostic technique for HNSCC.",
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AB - Objective: The objectives of this study were to 1) determine differences in lifetime fluorescence between normal and malignant tissue of the upper aerodigestive tract, and 2) evaluate the potential of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) as a diagnostic instrument for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University-based medical center. Subjects and Methods: Nine patients with suspected HNSCC were included. In the operating room, a nitrogen pulse laser (337 nm, 700-picosecond pulse width) was used to induce tissue autofluorescence of normal tissue and suspected malignant lesions. Spectral intensities and time-domain measurements were obtained and compared with the histopathology at each site. A total of 53 sites were measured. The fluorescence parameters that provided the most discrimination were determined. Results: Differences in spectral intensities allowed for discrimination between malignant and normal tissue. The spectral intensity of malignant tissue was lower than that of normal tissue, and a shift of peak intensity to a longer wavelength was observed in the normalized spectrum of malignant tissue in the range of 360 to approximately 660 nm. Multiple time-resolved fluorescence parameters provided the best diagnostic discrimination between normal tissue and carcinoma, including average lifetimes (i.e., at 390 nm: 1.7 ± 0.06 ns [not significant] for normal and 1.3 ± 0.06 ns for tumor, P = 0.0025) and the second-order Laguerre expansion coefficient (LEC-2) (i.e., at 460 nm: 0.135 ± 0.001 for normal and 0.155 ± 0.007 for tumor, P < 0.05). Conclusion: These findings highlight some of the differences in lifetime fluorescence between normal and malignant tissue. TR-LIFS has potential as a noninvasive diagnostic technique for HNSCC.

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