Time course of the subjective emotional response to aversive pictures: Relevance to fMRI studies

Amy S. Garrett, Richard J Maddock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study brain activity related to the experience of emotion presents unique challenges to neuroscientists. One important consideration arises when an experimentally induced subjective emotional response persists after the end of the emotional stimulation epoch. In this case, brain activity related to the emotional response may continue during the subsequent control or comparison epoch. The comparison epoch of the experiment may then contain a lingering emotional response. This study was conducted to better understand the time course of the subjective emotional response to intensely aversive pictures, with the goal of applying this knowledge to the design and analysis of fMRI studies of emotion. A total of 18 women in two separate experiments were shown a series of aversive, neutral and scrambled pictures presented in alternating block designs. Subjects rated the intensity of their negative feelings every 4 s while viewing the pictures. Results indicate that the subjective emotional response persists well after the end of the emotional stimulation epoch. Following a 16-s block of aversive pictures, an average of an additional 16 s elapsed before self-reported negative feelings showed a 74-80% decline. These data suggest that fMRI studies of emotion should consider the time course of the subjective response to emotionally laden stimuli.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-48
Number of pages10
JournalPsychiatry Research - Neuroimaging
Volume108
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 5 2001

Fingerprint

Emotions
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Brain

Keywords

  • Affect
  • Emotions
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging
  • Human
  • Neuroimaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Time course of the subjective emotional response to aversive pictures : Relevance to fMRI studies. / Garrett, Amy S.; Maddock, Richard J.

In: Psychiatry Research - Neuroimaging, Vol. 108, No. 1, 05.11.2001, p. 39-48.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{00f3fddca6f6458e814b87cbb8f5a9ef,
title = "Time course of the subjective emotional response to aversive pictures: Relevance to fMRI studies",
abstract = "Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study brain activity related to the experience of emotion presents unique challenges to neuroscientists. One important consideration arises when an experimentally induced subjective emotional response persists after the end of the emotional stimulation epoch. In this case, brain activity related to the emotional response may continue during the subsequent control or comparison epoch. The comparison epoch of the experiment may then contain a lingering emotional response. This study was conducted to better understand the time course of the subjective emotional response to intensely aversive pictures, with the goal of applying this knowledge to the design and analysis of fMRI studies of emotion. A total of 18 women in two separate experiments were shown a series of aversive, neutral and scrambled pictures presented in alternating block designs. Subjects rated the intensity of their negative feelings every 4 s while viewing the pictures. Results indicate that the subjective emotional response persists well after the end of the emotional stimulation epoch. Following a 16-s block of aversive pictures, an average of an additional 16 s elapsed before self-reported negative feelings showed a 74-80{\%} decline. These data suggest that fMRI studies of emotion should consider the time course of the subjective response to emotionally laden stimuli.",
keywords = "Affect, Emotions, Functional magnetic resonance imaging, Human, Neuroimaging",
author = "Garrett, {Amy S.} and Maddock, {Richard J}",
year = "2001",
month = "11",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1016/S0925-4927(01)00110-X",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "108",
pages = "39--48",
journal = "Psychiatry Research - Neuroimaging",
issn = "0925-4927",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Time course of the subjective emotional response to aversive pictures

T2 - Relevance to fMRI studies

AU - Garrett, Amy S.

AU - Maddock, Richard J

PY - 2001/11/5

Y1 - 2001/11/5

N2 - Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study brain activity related to the experience of emotion presents unique challenges to neuroscientists. One important consideration arises when an experimentally induced subjective emotional response persists after the end of the emotional stimulation epoch. In this case, brain activity related to the emotional response may continue during the subsequent control or comparison epoch. The comparison epoch of the experiment may then contain a lingering emotional response. This study was conducted to better understand the time course of the subjective emotional response to intensely aversive pictures, with the goal of applying this knowledge to the design and analysis of fMRI studies of emotion. A total of 18 women in two separate experiments were shown a series of aversive, neutral and scrambled pictures presented in alternating block designs. Subjects rated the intensity of their negative feelings every 4 s while viewing the pictures. Results indicate that the subjective emotional response persists well after the end of the emotional stimulation epoch. Following a 16-s block of aversive pictures, an average of an additional 16 s elapsed before self-reported negative feelings showed a 74-80% decline. These data suggest that fMRI studies of emotion should consider the time course of the subjective response to emotionally laden stimuli.

AB - Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study brain activity related to the experience of emotion presents unique challenges to neuroscientists. One important consideration arises when an experimentally induced subjective emotional response persists after the end of the emotional stimulation epoch. In this case, brain activity related to the emotional response may continue during the subsequent control or comparison epoch. The comparison epoch of the experiment may then contain a lingering emotional response. This study was conducted to better understand the time course of the subjective emotional response to intensely aversive pictures, with the goal of applying this knowledge to the design and analysis of fMRI studies of emotion. A total of 18 women in two separate experiments were shown a series of aversive, neutral and scrambled pictures presented in alternating block designs. Subjects rated the intensity of their negative feelings every 4 s while viewing the pictures. Results indicate that the subjective emotional response persists well after the end of the emotional stimulation epoch. Following a 16-s block of aversive pictures, an average of an additional 16 s elapsed before self-reported negative feelings showed a 74-80% decline. These data suggest that fMRI studies of emotion should consider the time course of the subjective response to emotionally laden stimuli.

KW - Affect

KW - Emotions

KW - Functional magnetic resonance imaging

KW - Human

KW - Neuroimaging

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035813406&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035813406&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0925-4927(01)00110-X

DO - 10.1016/S0925-4927(01)00110-X

M3 - Article

C2 - 11677066

AN - SCOPUS:0035813406

VL - 108

SP - 39

EP - 48

JO - Psychiatry Research - Neuroimaging

JF - Psychiatry Research - Neuroimaging

SN - 0925-4927

IS - 1

ER -