Thin-fiber mechanoreceptors reflexly increase renal sympathetic nerve activity during static contraction

Kyung Kim Jong, Shawn G. Hayes, Angela E. Kindig, Marc P Kaufman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The renal vasoconstriction induced by the sympathetic outflow during exercise serves to direct blood flow from the kidney toward the exercising muscles. The renal circulation seems to be particularly important in this regard, because it receives a substantial part of the cardiac output, which in resting humans has been estimated to be 20%. The role of group III mechanoreceptors in causing the reflex renal sympathetic response to static contraction remains an open question. To shed some light on this question, we recorded the renal sympathetic nerve responses to static contraction before and after injection of gadolinium into the arterial supply of the statically contracting triceps surae muscles of decerebrate unanesthetized and chloralose-anesthetized cats. Gadolinium has been shown to be a selective blocker of mechanogated channels in thin-fiber muscle afferents, which comprise the afferent arm of the exercise pressor reflex arc. In decerebrate (n = 15) and chloralose-anesthetized (n = 12) cats, we found that gadolinium (10 mM; 1 ml) significantly attenuated the renal sympathetic nerve and pressor responses to static contraction (60 s) after a latent period of 60 min; both responses recovered after a latent period of 120 min. We conclude that thin-fiber mechanoreceptors supplying contracting muscle are involved in some of the renal vasoconstriction evoked by the exercise pressor reflex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume292
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007

Fingerprint

Mechanoreceptors
Kidney
Gadolinium
Reflex
Muscles
Chloralose
Vasoconstriction
Cats
Renal Circulation
Cardiac Output
Injections

Keywords

  • Autonomic nervous system
  • Cats
  • Exercise
  • Gadolinium
  • Group III muscle afferents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Thin-fiber mechanoreceptors reflexly increase renal sympathetic nerve activity during static contraction. / Jong, Kyung Kim; Hayes, Shawn G.; Kindig, Angela E.; Kaufman, Marc P.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 292, No. 2, 02.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f234708c515f4c7bb3749e60d9705c07,
title = "Thin-fiber mechanoreceptors reflexly increase renal sympathetic nerve activity during static contraction",
abstract = "The renal vasoconstriction induced by the sympathetic outflow during exercise serves to direct blood flow from the kidney toward the exercising muscles. The renal circulation seems to be particularly important in this regard, because it receives a substantial part of the cardiac output, which in resting humans has been estimated to be 20{\%}. The role of group III mechanoreceptors in causing the reflex renal sympathetic response to static contraction remains an open question. To shed some light on this question, we recorded the renal sympathetic nerve responses to static contraction before and after injection of gadolinium into the arterial supply of the statically contracting triceps surae muscles of decerebrate unanesthetized and chloralose-anesthetized cats. Gadolinium has been shown to be a selective blocker of mechanogated channels in thin-fiber muscle afferents, which comprise the afferent arm of the exercise pressor reflex arc. In decerebrate (n = 15) and chloralose-anesthetized (n = 12) cats, we found that gadolinium (10 mM; 1 ml) significantly attenuated the renal sympathetic nerve and pressor responses to static contraction (60 s) after a latent period of 60 min; both responses recovered after a latent period of 120 min. We conclude that thin-fiber mechanoreceptors supplying contracting muscle are involved in some of the renal vasoconstriction evoked by the exercise pressor reflex.",
keywords = "Autonomic nervous system, Cats, Exercise, Gadolinium, Group III muscle afferents",
author = "Jong, {Kyung Kim} and Hayes, {Shawn G.} and Kindig, {Angela E.} and Kaufman, {Marc P}",
year = "2007",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1152/ajpheart.00771.2006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "292",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology",
issn = "0363-6135",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Thin-fiber mechanoreceptors reflexly increase renal sympathetic nerve activity during static contraction

AU - Jong, Kyung Kim

AU - Hayes, Shawn G.

AU - Kindig, Angela E.

AU - Kaufman, Marc P

PY - 2007/2

Y1 - 2007/2

N2 - The renal vasoconstriction induced by the sympathetic outflow during exercise serves to direct blood flow from the kidney toward the exercising muscles. The renal circulation seems to be particularly important in this regard, because it receives a substantial part of the cardiac output, which in resting humans has been estimated to be 20%. The role of group III mechanoreceptors in causing the reflex renal sympathetic response to static contraction remains an open question. To shed some light on this question, we recorded the renal sympathetic nerve responses to static contraction before and after injection of gadolinium into the arterial supply of the statically contracting triceps surae muscles of decerebrate unanesthetized and chloralose-anesthetized cats. Gadolinium has been shown to be a selective blocker of mechanogated channels in thin-fiber muscle afferents, which comprise the afferent arm of the exercise pressor reflex arc. In decerebrate (n = 15) and chloralose-anesthetized (n = 12) cats, we found that gadolinium (10 mM; 1 ml) significantly attenuated the renal sympathetic nerve and pressor responses to static contraction (60 s) after a latent period of 60 min; both responses recovered after a latent period of 120 min. We conclude that thin-fiber mechanoreceptors supplying contracting muscle are involved in some of the renal vasoconstriction evoked by the exercise pressor reflex.

AB - The renal vasoconstriction induced by the sympathetic outflow during exercise serves to direct blood flow from the kidney toward the exercising muscles. The renal circulation seems to be particularly important in this regard, because it receives a substantial part of the cardiac output, which in resting humans has been estimated to be 20%. The role of group III mechanoreceptors in causing the reflex renal sympathetic response to static contraction remains an open question. To shed some light on this question, we recorded the renal sympathetic nerve responses to static contraction before and after injection of gadolinium into the arterial supply of the statically contracting triceps surae muscles of decerebrate unanesthetized and chloralose-anesthetized cats. Gadolinium has been shown to be a selective blocker of mechanogated channels in thin-fiber muscle afferents, which comprise the afferent arm of the exercise pressor reflex arc. In decerebrate (n = 15) and chloralose-anesthetized (n = 12) cats, we found that gadolinium (10 mM; 1 ml) significantly attenuated the renal sympathetic nerve and pressor responses to static contraction (60 s) after a latent period of 60 min; both responses recovered after a latent period of 120 min. We conclude that thin-fiber mechanoreceptors supplying contracting muscle are involved in some of the renal vasoconstriction evoked by the exercise pressor reflex.

KW - Autonomic nervous system

KW - Cats

KW - Exercise

KW - Gadolinium

KW - Group III muscle afferents

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33846949010&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33846949010&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1152/ajpheart.00771.2006

DO - 10.1152/ajpheart.00771.2006

M3 - Article

VL - 292

JO - American Journal of Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology

SN - 0363-6135

IS - 2

ER -