Thermoregulation in a nocturnal, tropical, arboreal snake

Nancy Anderson, Thomas E. Hetherington, Brad Coupe, Gad Perry, Joseph B. Williams, Jeff Lehman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Few studies have focused on the thermal biology of tropical or nocturnal snakes. We recorded preferred body temperatures (Tb) of seven Brown Treesnakes (Boiga irregularis) in the laboratory and compared these to operative temperatures obtained with copper models and Tbs obtained by radiotelemetry from 11 free-ranging snakes on Guam. Operative temperatures on Guam did not vary across refuge types, unless the site received direct solar radiation. In a thermal gradient and on Guam, Brown Treesnakes thermoregulated around two distinct temperature ranges (21.3-24.9°C; 28.1-31.3°C). In the gradient, brown treesnakes exhibited elevated Tb into the higher range only in the evening. On Guam, snakes achieved Tbs in the high range only when direct solar radiation was available during the afternoon, a period when snakes were inactive. Higher mean Tbs on sunny days corresponded with observations of basking behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82-90
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Herpetology
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Guam
thermoregulation
snake
snakes
solar radiation
Boiga irregularis
temperature
radiotelemetry
body temperature
radio telemetry
temperature profiles
refuge
copper
heat
Biological Sciences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Thermoregulation in a nocturnal, tropical, arboreal snake. / Anderson, Nancy; Hetherington, Thomas E.; Coupe, Brad; Perry, Gad; Williams, Joseph B.; Lehman, Jeff.

In: Journal of Herpetology, Vol. 39, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 82-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Anderson, N, Hetherington, TE, Coupe, B, Perry, G, Williams, JB & Lehman, J 2005, 'Thermoregulation in a nocturnal, tropical, arboreal snake', Journal of Herpetology, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 82-90. https://doi.org/10.1670/0022-1511(2005)039[0082:TIANTA]2.0.CO;2
Anderson, Nancy ; Hetherington, Thomas E. ; Coupe, Brad ; Perry, Gad ; Williams, Joseph B. ; Lehman, Jeff. / Thermoregulation in a nocturnal, tropical, arboreal snake. In: Journal of Herpetology. 2005 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 82-90.
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