The use of metabolomics in population-based research

L. Joseph Su, Oliver Fiehn, Padma Maruvada, Steven C. Moore, Stephen J. O'Keefe, David S. Wishart, Krista A. Zanetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The NIH has made a significant commitment through the NIH Common Fund's Metabolomics Program to build infrastructure and capacity for metabolomics research, which should accelerate the field. Given this investment, it is the ideal time to start planning strategies to capitalize on the infrastructure being established. An obvious gap in the literature relates to the effective use of metabolomics in large-population studies. Although published reports from population-based studies are beginning to emerge, the number to date remains relatively small. Yet, there is great potential for using metabolomics in population-based studies to evaluate the effects of nutritional, pharmaceutical, and environmental exposures (the "exposome"); conduct risk assessments; predict disease development; and diagnose diseases. Currently, the majority of the metabolomics studies in human populations are in nutrition or nutrition-related fields. This symposium provided a timely venue to highlight the current state-of-science on the use of metabolomics in population-based research. This session provided a forum at which investigators with extensive experience in performing research within large initiatives, multi-investigator grants, and epidemiology consortia could stimulate discussion and ideas for population-based metabolomics research and, in turn, improve knowledge to help devise effective methods of health research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)785-788
Number of pages4
JournalAdvances in Nutrition
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Metabolomics
metabolomics
Research
Population
infrastructure
Research Personnel
nutrition
Organized Financing
Environmental Exposure
disease diagnosis
human population
risk assessment
epidemiology
Epidemiology
planning
drugs
Health
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Su, L. J., Fiehn, O., Maruvada, P., Moore, S. C., O'Keefe, S. J., Wishart, D. S., & Zanetti, K. A. (2014). The use of metabolomics in population-based research. Advances in Nutrition, 5(6), 785-788. https://doi.org/10.3945/an.114.006494

The use of metabolomics in population-based research. / Su, L. Joseph; Fiehn, Oliver; Maruvada, Padma; Moore, Steven C.; O'Keefe, Stephen J.; Wishart, David S.; Zanetti, Krista A.

In: Advances in Nutrition, Vol. 5, No. 6, 2014, p. 785-788.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Su, LJ, Fiehn, O, Maruvada, P, Moore, SC, O'Keefe, SJ, Wishart, DS & Zanetti, KA 2014, 'The use of metabolomics in population-based research', Advances in Nutrition, vol. 5, no. 6, pp. 785-788. https://doi.org/10.3945/an.114.006494
Su LJ, Fiehn O, Maruvada P, Moore SC, O'Keefe SJ, Wishart DS et al. The use of metabolomics in population-based research. Advances in Nutrition. 2014;5(6):785-788. https://doi.org/10.3945/an.114.006494
Su, L. Joseph ; Fiehn, Oliver ; Maruvada, Padma ; Moore, Steven C. ; O'Keefe, Stephen J. ; Wishart, David S. ; Zanetti, Krista A. / The use of metabolomics in population-based research. In: Advances in Nutrition. 2014 ; Vol. 5, No. 6. pp. 785-788.
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