The use of actigraphy to study sleep disorders in preschoolers

Some concerns about detection of nighttime awakenings

Stephanie L. Sitnick, Beth L. Goodlin-Jones, Thomas F. Anders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objectives: This study compared actigraphy with videosomnography in preschool-aged children, with special emphasis on the accuracy of detection of nighttime awakenings. Design: Fifty-eight participants wore an actigraph for 1 week and were videotaped for 2 nights while wearing the actigraph. Setting: Participants were solitary sleepers, studied in their homes. Participants: One group (n = 22) was diagnosed with autism, another group (n = 11) had developmental delays without autism, and a third group (n = 25) were typically developing children; age ranged from 28 to 73 months (mean age 47 months); 29 boys and 29 girls. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Nocturnal sleep and wakefulness were scored from simultaneously recorded videosomnography and actigraphy. The accuracy of actigraphy was examined in an epoch-by-epoch comparison with videosomnography. Findings were 94% overall agreement, 97% sensitivity, and 24% specificity. Statistical corrections for overall agreement and specificity resulted in an 89% weighted-agreement and 27% adjusted specificity. Conclusions: Actigraphy has poor agreement for detecting nocturnal awakenings, compared with video observations, in preschool-aged children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)395-401
Number of pages7
JournalSleep
Volume31
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Actigraphy
Preschool Children
Autistic Disorder
Wakefulness
Sleep
Sensitivity and Specificity
Sleep Wake Disorders

Keywords

  • Actigraphy
  • Preschool age children
  • Sleep
  • Videosomnography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Sitnick, S. L., Goodlin-Jones, B. L., & Anders, T. F. (2008). The use of actigraphy to study sleep disorders in preschoolers: Some concerns about detection of nighttime awakenings. Sleep, 31(3), 395-401.

The use of actigraphy to study sleep disorders in preschoolers : Some concerns about detection of nighttime awakenings. / Sitnick, Stephanie L.; Goodlin-Jones, Beth L.; Anders, Thomas F.

In: Sleep, Vol. 31, No. 3, 2008, p. 395-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sitnick, SL, Goodlin-Jones, BL & Anders, TF 2008, 'The use of actigraphy to study sleep disorders in preschoolers: Some concerns about detection of nighttime awakenings', Sleep, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 395-401.
Sitnick, Stephanie L. ; Goodlin-Jones, Beth L. ; Anders, Thomas F. / The use of actigraphy to study sleep disorders in preschoolers : Some concerns about detection of nighttime awakenings. In: Sleep. 2008 ; Vol. 31, No. 3. pp. 395-401.
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