The serine phosphorylation hypothesis of polycystic ovary syndrome

a unifying mechanism for hyperandrogenemia and insulin resistance

Andrew A. Bremer, Walter L. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrinopathy affecting 4%-8% of reproductive-aged women. The syndrome is characterized by hyperandrogenemia and disordered gonadotropin secretion and is often associated with insulin resistance. However, rather than being one disease entity caused by a single molecular defect, PCOS under its current diagnostic criteria most likely includes a number of distinct disease processes with similar clinical phenotypes but different pathophysiologic mechanisms. The serine phosphorylation hypothesis can potentially explain two major features of PCOS-hyperandrogenemia and insulin resistance. Further defining the molecular mechanisms regulating androgen biosynthesis and insulin action in PCOS patients will permit a better understanding of the syndrome and may lead to the generation of novel specific pharmacologic therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1039-1048
Number of pages10
JournalFertility and Sterility
Volume89
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2008

Fingerprint

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Serine
Insulin Resistance
Phosphorylation
Gonadotropins
Androgens
Insulin
Phenotype
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • hyperandrogenemia
  • insulin resistance
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome
  • serine phosphorylation
  • steroidogenesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

The serine phosphorylation hypothesis of polycystic ovary syndrome : a unifying mechanism for hyperandrogenemia and insulin resistance. / Bremer, Andrew A.; Miller, Walter L.

In: Fertility and Sterility, Vol. 89, No. 5, 05.2008, p. 1039-1048.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{9b459c70cea0421ea4f86bfdc60aa0e6,
title = "The serine phosphorylation hypothesis of polycystic ovary syndrome: a unifying mechanism for hyperandrogenemia and insulin resistance",
abstract = "Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrinopathy affecting 4{\%}-8{\%} of reproductive-aged women. The syndrome is characterized by hyperandrogenemia and disordered gonadotropin secretion and is often associated with insulin resistance. However, rather than being one disease entity caused by a single molecular defect, PCOS under its current diagnostic criteria most likely includes a number of distinct disease processes with similar clinical phenotypes but different pathophysiologic mechanisms. The serine phosphorylation hypothesis can potentially explain two major features of PCOS-hyperandrogenemia and insulin resistance. Further defining the molecular mechanisms regulating androgen biosynthesis and insulin action in PCOS patients will permit a better understanding of the syndrome and may lead to the generation of novel specific pharmacologic therapies.",
keywords = "hyperandrogenemia, insulin resistance, Polycystic ovary syndrome, serine phosphorylation, steroidogenesis",
author = "Bremer, {Andrew A.} and Miller, {Walter L.}",
year = "2008",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.fertnstert.2008.02.091",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "89",
pages = "1039--1048",
journal = "Fertility and Sterility",
issn = "0015-0282",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The serine phosphorylation hypothesis of polycystic ovary syndrome

T2 - a unifying mechanism for hyperandrogenemia and insulin resistance

AU - Bremer, Andrew A.

AU - Miller, Walter L.

PY - 2008/5

Y1 - 2008/5

N2 - Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrinopathy affecting 4%-8% of reproductive-aged women. The syndrome is characterized by hyperandrogenemia and disordered gonadotropin secretion and is often associated with insulin resistance. However, rather than being one disease entity caused by a single molecular defect, PCOS under its current diagnostic criteria most likely includes a number of distinct disease processes with similar clinical phenotypes but different pathophysiologic mechanisms. The serine phosphorylation hypothesis can potentially explain two major features of PCOS-hyperandrogenemia and insulin resistance. Further defining the molecular mechanisms regulating androgen biosynthesis and insulin action in PCOS patients will permit a better understanding of the syndrome and may lead to the generation of novel specific pharmacologic therapies.

AB - Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrinopathy affecting 4%-8% of reproductive-aged women. The syndrome is characterized by hyperandrogenemia and disordered gonadotropin secretion and is often associated with insulin resistance. However, rather than being one disease entity caused by a single molecular defect, PCOS under its current diagnostic criteria most likely includes a number of distinct disease processes with similar clinical phenotypes but different pathophysiologic mechanisms. The serine phosphorylation hypothesis can potentially explain two major features of PCOS-hyperandrogenemia and insulin resistance. Further defining the molecular mechanisms regulating androgen biosynthesis and insulin action in PCOS patients will permit a better understanding of the syndrome and may lead to the generation of novel specific pharmacologic therapies.

KW - hyperandrogenemia

KW - insulin resistance

KW - Polycystic ovary syndrome

KW - serine phosphorylation

KW - steroidogenesis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=43449090965&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=43449090965&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2008.02.091

DO - 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2008.02.091

M3 - Article

VL - 89

SP - 1039

EP - 1048

JO - Fertility and Sterility

JF - Fertility and Sterility

SN - 0015-0282

IS - 5

ER -