The role of sleep difficulties in the vasomotor menopausal symptoms and depressed mood relationships: An international pooled analysis of eight studies in the InterLACE consortium

Hsin Fang Chung, Nirmala Pandeya, Annette J. Dobson, Diana Kuh, Eric J. Brunner, Sybil L. Crawford, Nancy E. Avis, Ellen B Gold, Ellen S. Mitchell, Nancy F. Woods, Joyce T. Bromberger, Rebecca C. Thurston, Hadine Joffe, Toyoko Yoshizawa, Debra Anderson, Gita D. Mishra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Many women experience both vasomotor menopausal symptoms (VMS) and depressed mood at midlife, but little is known regarding the prospective bi-directional relationships between VMS and depressed mood and the role of sleep difficulties in both directions.Methods A pooled analysis was conducted using data from 21 312 women (median: 50 years, interquartile range 49-51) in eight studies from the InterLACE consortium. The degree of VMS, sleep difficulties, and depressed mood was self-reported and categorised as never, rarely, sometimes, and often (if reporting frequency) or never, mild, moderate, and severe (if reporting severity). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the bi-directional associations adjusted for within-study correlation.Results At baseline, the prevalence of VMS (40%, range 13-62%) and depressed mood (26%, 8-41%) varied substantially across studies, and a strong dose-dependent association between VMS and likelihood of depressed mood was found. Over 3 years of follow-up, women with often/severe VMS at baseline were more likely to have subsequent depressed mood compared with those without VMS (odds ratios (OR) 1.56, 1.27-1.92). Women with often/severe depressed mood at baseline were also more likely to have subsequent VMS than those without depressed mood (OR 1.89, 1.47-2.44). With further adjustment for the degree of sleep difficulties at baseline, the OR of having a subsequent depressed mood associated with often/severe VMS was attenuated and no longer significant (OR 1.13, 0.90-1.40). Conversely, often/severe depressed mood remained significantly associated with subsequent VMS (OR 1.80, 1.38-2.34).Conclusions Difficulty in sleeping largely explained the relationship between VMS and subsequent depressed mood, but it had little impact on the relationship between depressed mood and subsequent VMS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2541-2549
Number of pages9
JournalPsychological Medicine
Volume48
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

Sleep
Odds Ratio
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Depressed mood
  • hot flushes
  • menopausal transition
  • night sweats
  • sleep difficulties
  • vasomotor menopausal symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The role of sleep difficulties in the vasomotor menopausal symptoms and depressed mood relationships : An international pooled analysis of eight studies in the InterLACE consortium. / Chung, Hsin Fang; Pandeya, Nirmala; Dobson, Annette J.; Kuh, Diana; Brunner, Eric J.; Crawford, Sybil L.; Avis, Nancy E.; Gold, Ellen B; Mitchell, Ellen S.; Woods, Nancy F.; Bromberger, Joyce T.; Thurston, Rebecca C.; Joffe, Hadine; Yoshizawa, Toyoko; Anderson, Debra; Mishra, Gita D.

In: Psychological Medicine, Vol. 48, No. 15, 01.11.2018, p. 2541-2549.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chung, HF, Pandeya, N, Dobson, AJ, Kuh, D, Brunner, EJ, Crawford, SL, Avis, NE, Gold, EB, Mitchell, ES, Woods, NF, Bromberger, JT, Thurston, RC, Joffe, H, Yoshizawa, T, Anderson, D & Mishra, GD 2018, 'The role of sleep difficulties in the vasomotor menopausal symptoms and depressed mood relationships: An international pooled analysis of eight studies in the InterLACE consortium', Psychological Medicine, vol. 48, no. 15, pp. 2541-2549. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291718000168
Chung, Hsin Fang ; Pandeya, Nirmala ; Dobson, Annette J. ; Kuh, Diana ; Brunner, Eric J. ; Crawford, Sybil L. ; Avis, Nancy E. ; Gold, Ellen B ; Mitchell, Ellen S. ; Woods, Nancy F. ; Bromberger, Joyce T. ; Thurston, Rebecca C. ; Joffe, Hadine ; Yoshizawa, Toyoko ; Anderson, Debra ; Mishra, Gita D. / The role of sleep difficulties in the vasomotor menopausal symptoms and depressed mood relationships : An international pooled analysis of eight studies in the InterLACE consortium. In: Psychological Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 48, No. 15. pp. 2541-2549.
@article{28a11529efd64b638a374961e89c96fb,
title = "The role of sleep difficulties in the vasomotor menopausal symptoms and depressed mood relationships: An international pooled analysis of eight studies in the InterLACE consortium",
abstract = "Background Many women experience both vasomotor menopausal symptoms (VMS) and depressed mood at midlife, but little is known regarding the prospective bi-directional relationships between VMS and depressed mood and the role of sleep difficulties in both directions.Methods A pooled analysis was conducted using data from 21 312 women (median: 50 years, interquartile range 49-51) in eight studies from the InterLACE consortium. The degree of VMS, sleep difficulties, and depressed mood was self-reported and categorised as never, rarely, sometimes, and often (if reporting frequency) or never, mild, moderate, and severe (if reporting severity). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the bi-directional associations adjusted for within-study correlation.Results At baseline, the prevalence of VMS (40{\%}, range 13-62{\%}) and depressed mood (26{\%}, 8-41{\%}) varied substantially across studies, and a strong dose-dependent association between VMS and likelihood of depressed mood was found. Over 3 years of follow-up, women with often/severe VMS at baseline were more likely to have subsequent depressed mood compared with those without VMS (odds ratios (OR) 1.56, 1.27-1.92). Women with often/severe depressed mood at baseline were also more likely to have subsequent VMS than those without depressed mood (OR 1.89, 1.47-2.44). With further adjustment for the degree of sleep difficulties at baseline, the OR of having a subsequent depressed mood associated with often/severe VMS was attenuated and no longer significant (OR 1.13, 0.90-1.40). Conversely, often/severe depressed mood remained significantly associated with subsequent VMS (OR 1.80, 1.38-2.34).Conclusions Difficulty in sleeping largely explained the relationship between VMS and subsequent depressed mood, but it had little impact on the relationship between depressed mood and subsequent VMS.",
keywords = "Depressed mood, hot flushes, menopausal transition, night sweats, sleep difficulties, vasomotor menopausal symptoms",
author = "Chung, {Hsin Fang} and Nirmala Pandeya and Dobson, {Annette J.} and Diana Kuh and Brunner, {Eric J.} and Crawford, {Sybil L.} and Avis, {Nancy E.} and Gold, {Ellen B} and Mitchell, {Ellen S.} and Woods, {Nancy F.} and Bromberger, {Joyce T.} and Thurston, {Rebecca C.} and Hadine Joffe and Toyoko Yoshizawa and Debra Anderson and Mishra, {Gita D.}",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/S0033291718000168",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "48",
pages = "2541--2549",
journal = "Psychological Medicine",
issn = "0033-2917",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "15",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of sleep difficulties in the vasomotor menopausal symptoms and depressed mood relationships

T2 - An international pooled analysis of eight studies in the InterLACE consortium

AU - Chung, Hsin Fang

AU - Pandeya, Nirmala

AU - Dobson, Annette J.

AU - Kuh, Diana

AU - Brunner, Eric J.

AU - Crawford, Sybil L.

AU - Avis, Nancy E.

AU - Gold, Ellen B

AU - Mitchell, Ellen S.

AU - Woods, Nancy F.

AU - Bromberger, Joyce T.

AU - Thurston, Rebecca C.

AU - Joffe, Hadine

AU - Yoshizawa, Toyoko

AU - Anderson, Debra

AU - Mishra, Gita D.

PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - Background Many women experience both vasomotor menopausal symptoms (VMS) and depressed mood at midlife, but little is known regarding the prospective bi-directional relationships between VMS and depressed mood and the role of sleep difficulties in both directions.Methods A pooled analysis was conducted using data from 21 312 women (median: 50 years, interquartile range 49-51) in eight studies from the InterLACE consortium. The degree of VMS, sleep difficulties, and depressed mood was self-reported and categorised as never, rarely, sometimes, and often (if reporting frequency) or never, mild, moderate, and severe (if reporting severity). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the bi-directional associations adjusted for within-study correlation.Results At baseline, the prevalence of VMS (40%, range 13-62%) and depressed mood (26%, 8-41%) varied substantially across studies, and a strong dose-dependent association between VMS and likelihood of depressed mood was found. Over 3 years of follow-up, women with often/severe VMS at baseline were more likely to have subsequent depressed mood compared with those without VMS (odds ratios (OR) 1.56, 1.27-1.92). Women with often/severe depressed mood at baseline were also more likely to have subsequent VMS than those without depressed mood (OR 1.89, 1.47-2.44). With further adjustment for the degree of sleep difficulties at baseline, the OR of having a subsequent depressed mood associated with often/severe VMS was attenuated and no longer significant (OR 1.13, 0.90-1.40). Conversely, often/severe depressed mood remained significantly associated with subsequent VMS (OR 1.80, 1.38-2.34).Conclusions Difficulty in sleeping largely explained the relationship between VMS and subsequent depressed mood, but it had little impact on the relationship between depressed mood and subsequent VMS.

AB - Background Many women experience both vasomotor menopausal symptoms (VMS) and depressed mood at midlife, but little is known regarding the prospective bi-directional relationships between VMS and depressed mood and the role of sleep difficulties in both directions.Methods A pooled analysis was conducted using data from 21 312 women (median: 50 years, interquartile range 49-51) in eight studies from the InterLACE consortium. The degree of VMS, sleep difficulties, and depressed mood was self-reported and categorised as never, rarely, sometimes, and often (if reporting frequency) or never, mild, moderate, and severe (if reporting severity). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine the bi-directional associations adjusted for within-study correlation.Results At baseline, the prevalence of VMS (40%, range 13-62%) and depressed mood (26%, 8-41%) varied substantially across studies, and a strong dose-dependent association between VMS and likelihood of depressed mood was found. Over 3 years of follow-up, women with often/severe VMS at baseline were more likely to have subsequent depressed mood compared with those without VMS (odds ratios (OR) 1.56, 1.27-1.92). Women with often/severe depressed mood at baseline were also more likely to have subsequent VMS than those without depressed mood (OR 1.89, 1.47-2.44). With further adjustment for the degree of sleep difficulties at baseline, the OR of having a subsequent depressed mood associated with often/severe VMS was attenuated and no longer significant (OR 1.13, 0.90-1.40). Conversely, often/severe depressed mood remained significantly associated with subsequent VMS (OR 1.80, 1.38-2.34).Conclusions Difficulty in sleeping largely explained the relationship between VMS and subsequent depressed mood, but it had little impact on the relationship between depressed mood and subsequent VMS.

KW - Depressed mood

KW - hot flushes

KW - menopausal transition

KW - night sweats

KW - sleep difficulties

KW - vasomotor menopausal symptoms

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85041893600&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85041893600&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0033291718000168

DO - 10.1017/S0033291718000168

M3 - Article

C2 - 29429422

AN - SCOPUS:85041893600

VL - 48

SP - 2541

EP - 2549

JO - Psychological Medicine

JF - Psychological Medicine

SN - 0033-2917

IS - 15

ER -