The role of immune dysfunction in the pathophysiology of autism

Charity Onore, Milo Careaga, Paul Ashwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

333 Scopus citations

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a complex group of neurodevelopmental disorders encompassing impairments in communication, social interactions and restricted stereotypical behaviors. Although a link between altered immune responses and ASD was first recognized nearly 40. years ago, only recently has new evidence started to shed light on the complex multifaceted relationship between immune dysfunction and behavior in ASD. Neurobiological research in ASD has highlighted pathways involved in neural development, synapse plasticity, structural brain abnormalities, cognition and behavior. At the same time, several lines of evidence point to altered immune dysfunction in ASD that directly impacts some or all these neurological processes. Extensive alterations in immune function have now been described in both children and adults with ASD, including ongoing inflammation in brain specimens, elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine profiles in the CSF and blood, increased presence of brain-specific auto-antibodies and altered immune cell function. Furthermore, these dysfunctional immune responses are associated with increased impairments in behaviors characteristic of core features of ASD, in particular, deficits in social interactions and communication. This accumulating evidence suggests that immune processes play a key role in the pathophysiology of ASD. This review will discuss the current state of our knowledge of immune dysfunction in ASD, how these findings may impact on underlying neuro-immune mechanisms and implicate potential areas where the manipulation of the immune response could have an impact on behavior and immunity in ASD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-392
Number of pages10
JournalBrain, Behavior, and Immunity
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Cytokines
  • Maternal immune activation
  • Monocytes
  • Social interactions
  • T cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The role of immune dysfunction in the pathophysiology of autism'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this