The role of a right fronto-parietal network in cognitive control

Common activations for "Cues-to-Attend" and response inhibition

Catherine Fassbender, C. Simoes-Franklin, K. Murphy, R. Hester, J. Meaney, I. H. Roberton, Hugh Garavan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Seemingly distinct cognitive tasks often activate similar anatomical networks. For example, the right fronto-parietal cortex is active across a wide variety of paradigms suggesting that these regions may subserve a general cognitive function. We utilized fMRI and a GO/NOGO task consisting of two conditions, one with intermittent unpredictive "cues-to-attend" and the other without any "cues-to-attend," in order to investigate areas involved in inhibition of a prepotent response and top-down attentional control. Sixteen subjects (5 male, ages ranging from 20 to 30 years) responded to an alternating sequence of the letters X and Y and withheld responding when the alternating sequence was broken (e.g., when X followed an X). Cues were rare stimulus font-color changes, which were linked to a simple instruction to attend to the task at hand. We hypothesized that inhibitions and cues, despite requiring quite different responses from subjects, might engage similar top-down attentional control processes and would thus share a common network of anatomical substrates. Although inhibitions and cues activated a number of distinct brain regions, a similar network of right dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal regions was active for both. These results suggest that this network, commonly activated for response inhibition, may subserve a more general cognitive control process involved in allocating top-down attentional resources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)286-296
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Psychophysiology
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 20 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cues
Parietal Lobe
Cognition
Color
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Inhibition (Psychology)
Brain

Keywords

  • Cues
  • Right DLPFC
  • Top-down control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology

Cite this

The role of a right fronto-parietal network in cognitive control : Common activations for "Cues-to-Attend" and response inhibition. / Fassbender, Catherine; Simoes-Franklin, C.; Murphy, K.; Hester, R.; Meaney, J.; Roberton, I. H.; Garavan, Hugh.

In: Journal of Psychophysiology, Vol. 20, No. 4, 20.11.2006, p. 286-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fassbender, Catherine ; Simoes-Franklin, C. ; Murphy, K. ; Hester, R. ; Meaney, J. ; Roberton, I. H. ; Garavan, Hugh. / The role of a right fronto-parietal network in cognitive control : Common activations for "Cues-to-Attend" and response inhibition. In: Journal of Psychophysiology. 2006 ; Vol. 20, No. 4. pp. 286-296.
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