The relationship between antecedent antibiotic use and resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins in group I β-lactamase-producing organisms

K. L. Jacobson, Stuart H Cohen, J. F. Inciardi, J. H. King, W. E. Lippert, T. Iglesias, C. J. VanCouwenberghe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

142 Scopus citations

Abstract

Gram-negative pathogens are increasingly resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs). Using a prospective, case-controlled observational study, we examined the prevalence and the risk factors for development of resistance to ESCs in group I β-lactamase-producing organisms. Of the 386 isolates of Enterobacter species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Citrobacter species, and Serratia marsescens from 340 consecutive patients, 70 (18.1%) were resistant to ESCs; the highest rates of resistance were found among Citrobacter freundii (40.9%), Enterobacter cloacae (31.1%), and Enterobacter aerogenes isolates (18.9%). Patients' prior antibiotic use and the mean number of antibiotics used were significantly greater in association with resistant vs. susceptible isolates. Resistance was associated with prior use of ceftizoxime or cefotaxime (P = .008), ceftazidime (P = .004), and piperacillin (P = .001). Other antibiotics were not associated with resistance. Resistance was less frequent in patients receiving ESCs and an aminoglycoside. We conclude that prior use of ESCs is associated with the isolation of resistant group I β-lactamase-producing organisms. Concomitant use of an aminoglycoside may decrease this risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1107-1113
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume21
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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