The relation between diabetes self-efficacy and psychological distress among older adults

Do racial and ethnic differences exist?

Giyeon Kim, Ruth Shim, Katy L. Ford, Tamara A. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study examined racial/ethnic differences in the relationship between diabetes self-efficacy and psychological distress among older adults with diabetes mellitus. Method: Adults aged 60 or older with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (N = 3,067) were drawn from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS). Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted. Results: After controlling for covariates, African Americans and those with higher levels of diabetes self-efficacy tended to have lower levels of psychological distress. Significant interactions were found in the Hispanic/Latino and Asian groups: The effect of diabetes self-efficacy on psychological distress was greater for Hispanics/Latinos and Asians than non-Hispanic Whites. Discussion: Findings suggest that diabetes self-efficacy is associated with psychological distress among older diabetic patients and that race/ethnicity moderates the relationship between diabetes self-efficacy and psychological distress. Increasing diabetes self-efficacy will help racial/ethnic minority older patients with diabetes to improve psychological well-being at a greater level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)320-333
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
chronic illness
self-efficacy
Psychology
Hispanic Americans
Diabetes Mellitus
Health Surveys
African Americans
Regression Analysis
Interviews
national minority
ethnicity
well-being
regression
interaction
interview
health

Keywords

  • diabetes
  • health disparities
  • psychological distress
  • race/ethnicity
  • self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gerontology
  • Community and Home Care
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

The relation between diabetes self-efficacy and psychological distress among older adults : Do racial and ethnic differences exist? / Kim, Giyeon; Shim, Ruth; Ford, Katy L.; Baker, Tamara A.

In: Journal of Aging and Health, Vol. 27, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 320-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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