The regulation of sex determination and sexually dimorphic differentiation in Drosophila

Kenneth C. Burtis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sex determination and sexually dimorphic differentiation in Drosophila involve multiple regulatory mechanisms, including alternative splicing, transcriptional control, subcellular compartmentalization, and intercellular signal transduction. Regulatory interactions occur throughout the development of the fly, some requiring the continuous function of the genes involved, and others being temporally limited, but having permanent consequences. The control of sexual differentiation in Drosophila is, for the most part, subject to the continuous active control of numerous regulatory proteins operating at many levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1006-1014
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Opinion in Cell Biology
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

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Drosophila
Sex Differentiation
Alternative Splicing
Diptera
Signal Transduction
Genes
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

The regulation of sex determination and sexually dimorphic differentiation in Drosophila. / Burtis, Kenneth C.

In: Current Opinion in Cell Biology, Vol. 5, No. 6, 1993, p. 1006-1014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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