The primary auditory cortex in cetacean and human brain: A comparative analysis of neurofilament protein-containing pyramidal neurons

Patrick R. Hof, Ilya I. Glezer, Nancy Archin, William G. Janssen, Peter J. Morgane, John Morrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To extend our investigation of the anatomy of sensory systems in highly adapted aquatic and terrestrial mammals, we have analyzed the distribution of a particular population of efferent neurons in the cetacean and human primary auditory cortex using an antibody to non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein (SMI32). The neurofilament protein triplet is differentially distributed within neuronal subpopulations in the primate and cetacean neocortex. In primates, it appears that the somatodendritic domain of a subset of pyramidal neurons furnishing specific corticocortical connections contains high concentrations of neurofilament protein. In the human primary auditory cortex these neurons are located in layers III, V and VI, whereas in cetaceans they are concentrated almost exclusively in the cortical efferent layer IIIc/V. Previous analyses have shown that SMI32 immunoreactivity in the cetacean neocortex is uniformly distributed among functionally different areas, while in human neocortex, the distribution of SMI32-positive neurons exhibit a high degree of regional and laminar specialization that is correlated with the functional and anatomical diversity of the cortical areas. In addition, the overall distribution of SMI32-immunoreactive neurons in the cetacean neocortex is comparable to that observed in paralimbic areas of the human, suggesting that the cetacean neocortex has retained many features of phylogenetically older cortical regions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-95
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume146
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 26 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neurofilament Proteins
Auditory Cortex
Pyramidal Cells
Neocortex
Brain
Neurons
Primates
Efferent Neurons
Mammals
Anatomy
Antibodies
Population

Keywords

  • Brain evolution
  • Cetacean brain
  • Dolphin
  • Human brain
  • Neurofilament protein
  • Primate brain
  • Quantitative neuroanatomy
  • Whale

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

The primary auditory cortex in cetacean and human brain : A comparative analysis of neurofilament protein-containing pyramidal neurons. / Hof, Patrick R.; Glezer, Ilya I.; Archin, Nancy; Janssen, William G.; Morgane, Peter J.; Morrison, John.

In: Neuroscience Letters, Vol. 146, No. 1, 26.10.1992, p. 91-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hof, Patrick R. ; Glezer, Ilya I. ; Archin, Nancy ; Janssen, William G. ; Morgane, Peter J. ; Morrison, John. / The primary auditory cortex in cetacean and human brain : A comparative analysis of neurofilament protein-containing pyramidal neurons. In: Neuroscience Letters. 1992 ; Vol. 146, No. 1. pp. 91-95.
@article{564646c838664b649bf24302b18254ee,
title = "The primary auditory cortex in cetacean and human brain: A comparative analysis of neurofilament protein-containing pyramidal neurons",
abstract = "To extend our investigation of the anatomy of sensory systems in highly adapted aquatic and terrestrial mammals, we have analyzed the distribution of a particular population of efferent neurons in the cetacean and human primary auditory cortex using an antibody to non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein (SMI32). The neurofilament protein triplet is differentially distributed within neuronal subpopulations in the primate and cetacean neocortex. In primates, it appears that the somatodendritic domain of a subset of pyramidal neurons furnishing specific corticocortical connections contains high concentrations of neurofilament protein. In the human primary auditory cortex these neurons are located in layers III, V and VI, whereas in cetaceans they are concentrated almost exclusively in the cortical efferent layer IIIc/V. Previous analyses have shown that SMI32 immunoreactivity in the cetacean neocortex is uniformly distributed among functionally different areas, while in human neocortex, the distribution of SMI32-positive neurons exhibit a high degree of regional and laminar specialization that is correlated with the functional and anatomical diversity of the cortical areas. In addition, the overall distribution of SMI32-immunoreactive neurons in the cetacean neocortex is comparable to that observed in paralimbic areas of the human, suggesting that the cetacean neocortex has retained many features of phylogenetically older cortical regions.",
keywords = "Brain evolution, Cetacean brain, Dolphin, Human brain, Neurofilament protein, Primate brain, Quantitative neuroanatomy, Whale",
author = "Hof, {Patrick R.} and Glezer, {Ilya I.} and Nancy Archin and Janssen, {William G.} and Morgane, {Peter J.} and John Morrison",
year = "1992",
month = "10",
day = "26",
doi = "10.1016/0304-3940(92)90180-F",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "146",
pages = "91--95",
journal = "Neuroscience Letters",
issn = "0304-3940",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The primary auditory cortex in cetacean and human brain

T2 - A comparative analysis of neurofilament protein-containing pyramidal neurons

AU - Hof, Patrick R.

AU - Glezer, Ilya I.

AU - Archin, Nancy

AU - Janssen, William G.

AU - Morgane, Peter J.

AU - Morrison, John

PY - 1992/10/26

Y1 - 1992/10/26

N2 - To extend our investigation of the anatomy of sensory systems in highly adapted aquatic and terrestrial mammals, we have analyzed the distribution of a particular population of efferent neurons in the cetacean and human primary auditory cortex using an antibody to non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein (SMI32). The neurofilament protein triplet is differentially distributed within neuronal subpopulations in the primate and cetacean neocortex. In primates, it appears that the somatodendritic domain of a subset of pyramidal neurons furnishing specific corticocortical connections contains high concentrations of neurofilament protein. In the human primary auditory cortex these neurons are located in layers III, V and VI, whereas in cetaceans they are concentrated almost exclusively in the cortical efferent layer IIIc/V. Previous analyses have shown that SMI32 immunoreactivity in the cetacean neocortex is uniformly distributed among functionally different areas, while in human neocortex, the distribution of SMI32-positive neurons exhibit a high degree of regional and laminar specialization that is correlated with the functional and anatomical diversity of the cortical areas. In addition, the overall distribution of SMI32-immunoreactive neurons in the cetacean neocortex is comparable to that observed in paralimbic areas of the human, suggesting that the cetacean neocortex has retained many features of phylogenetically older cortical regions.

AB - To extend our investigation of the anatomy of sensory systems in highly adapted aquatic and terrestrial mammals, we have analyzed the distribution of a particular population of efferent neurons in the cetacean and human primary auditory cortex using an antibody to non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein (SMI32). The neurofilament protein triplet is differentially distributed within neuronal subpopulations in the primate and cetacean neocortex. In primates, it appears that the somatodendritic domain of a subset of pyramidal neurons furnishing specific corticocortical connections contains high concentrations of neurofilament protein. In the human primary auditory cortex these neurons are located in layers III, V and VI, whereas in cetaceans they are concentrated almost exclusively in the cortical efferent layer IIIc/V. Previous analyses have shown that SMI32 immunoreactivity in the cetacean neocortex is uniformly distributed among functionally different areas, while in human neocortex, the distribution of SMI32-positive neurons exhibit a high degree of regional and laminar specialization that is correlated with the functional and anatomical diversity of the cortical areas. In addition, the overall distribution of SMI32-immunoreactive neurons in the cetacean neocortex is comparable to that observed in paralimbic areas of the human, suggesting that the cetacean neocortex has retained many features of phylogenetically older cortical regions.

KW - Brain evolution

KW - Cetacean brain

KW - Dolphin

KW - Human brain

KW - Neurofilament protein

KW - Primate brain

KW - Quantitative neuroanatomy

KW - Whale

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0026466864&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0026466864&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0304-3940(92)90180-F

DO - 10.1016/0304-3940(92)90180-F

M3 - Article

C2 - 1475055

AN - SCOPUS:0026466864

VL - 146

SP - 91

EP - 95

JO - Neuroscience Letters

JF - Neuroscience Letters

SN - 0304-3940

IS - 1

ER -