The prevalence of shedding of Cryptosporidium and Giardia spp. based on a single fecal sample collection from each of 91 horses used for backcountry recreation

E. Johnson, Edward R Atwill, M. E. Filkins, J. Kalush

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia duodenalis are now recognized as primary enteric pathogens in animals and humans. Regulatory agencies, such as the Environmental Protection Agency are under increasing pressure to reduce the concentration of these protozoa in surface waters. Given the popularity of recreational riding of horses on public land in California backcountry, concerns have been raised by various regulatory agencies as to whether horses used for backcountry recreation are a significant source of C. parvum and G. duodenalis for the environment. The prevalence of fecal shedding of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in horses with a history of being ridden in California backcountry during 1993 and 1994 was estimated. Using both direct fluorescent antibody and levitation centrifugation tests, none of 91 single-collection fecal samples from throughout California had Cryptosporidium oocysts or Giardia cysts. Horses ranged from 4 to 24 years of age. Because none of the 91 samples, collected 1 time from each horse, were positive and assuming that the sensitivity and specificity of the test methods employed were 100%, the highest probable prevalence of shedding for either protozoal pathogen was <3.2% for the cohort of horses studied.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-60
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
Volume9
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1997

Fingerprint

Giardia
Recreation
Cryptosporidium
recreation
Horses
horses
Giardia lamblia
Cryptosporidium parvum
sampling
horse riding
animal pathogens
public lands
United States Environmental Protection Agency
oocysts
Oocysts
centrifugation
Protozoa
Centrifugation
surface water
testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

@article{54b5554d746c43a8ace9bfa4f25277e4,
title = "The prevalence of shedding of Cryptosporidium and Giardia spp. based on a single fecal sample collection from each of 91 horses used for backcountry recreation",
abstract = "Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia duodenalis are now recognized as primary enteric pathogens in animals and humans. Regulatory agencies, such as the Environmental Protection Agency are under increasing pressure to reduce the concentration of these protozoa in surface waters. Given the popularity of recreational riding of horses on public land in California backcountry, concerns have been raised by various regulatory agencies as to whether horses used for backcountry recreation are a significant source of C. parvum and G. duodenalis for the environment. The prevalence of fecal shedding of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in horses with a history of being ridden in California backcountry during 1993 and 1994 was estimated. Using both direct fluorescent antibody and levitation centrifugation tests, none of 91 single-collection fecal samples from throughout California had Cryptosporidium oocysts or Giardia cysts. Horses ranged from 4 to 24 years of age. Because none of the 91 samples, collected 1 time from each horse, were positive and assuming that the sensitivity and specificity of the test methods employed were 100{\%}, the highest probable prevalence of shedding for either protozoal pathogen was <3.2{\%} for the cohort of horses studied.",
author = "E. Johnson and Atwill, {Edward R} and Filkins, {M. E.} and J. Kalush",
year = "1997",
month = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "56--60",
journal = "Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation",
issn = "1040-6387",
publisher = "American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The prevalence of shedding of Cryptosporidium and Giardia spp. based on a single fecal sample collection from each of 91 horses used for backcountry recreation

AU - Johnson, E.

AU - Atwill, Edward R

AU - Filkins, M. E.

AU - Kalush, J.

PY - 1997/1

Y1 - 1997/1

N2 - Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia duodenalis are now recognized as primary enteric pathogens in animals and humans. Regulatory agencies, such as the Environmental Protection Agency are under increasing pressure to reduce the concentration of these protozoa in surface waters. Given the popularity of recreational riding of horses on public land in California backcountry, concerns have been raised by various regulatory agencies as to whether horses used for backcountry recreation are a significant source of C. parvum and G. duodenalis for the environment. The prevalence of fecal shedding of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in horses with a history of being ridden in California backcountry during 1993 and 1994 was estimated. Using both direct fluorescent antibody and levitation centrifugation tests, none of 91 single-collection fecal samples from throughout California had Cryptosporidium oocysts or Giardia cysts. Horses ranged from 4 to 24 years of age. Because none of the 91 samples, collected 1 time from each horse, were positive and assuming that the sensitivity and specificity of the test methods employed were 100%, the highest probable prevalence of shedding for either protozoal pathogen was <3.2% for the cohort of horses studied.

AB - Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia duodenalis are now recognized as primary enteric pathogens in animals and humans. Regulatory agencies, such as the Environmental Protection Agency are under increasing pressure to reduce the concentration of these protozoa in surface waters. Given the popularity of recreational riding of horses on public land in California backcountry, concerns have been raised by various regulatory agencies as to whether horses used for backcountry recreation are a significant source of C. parvum and G. duodenalis for the environment. The prevalence of fecal shedding of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in horses with a history of being ridden in California backcountry during 1993 and 1994 was estimated. Using both direct fluorescent antibody and levitation centrifugation tests, none of 91 single-collection fecal samples from throughout California had Cryptosporidium oocysts or Giardia cysts. Horses ranged from 4 to 24 years of age. Because none of the 91 samples, collected 1 time from each horse, were positive and assuming that the sensitivity and specificity of the test methods employed were 100%, the highest probable prevalence of shedding for either protozoal pathogen was <3.2% for the cohort of horses studied.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030624471&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030624471&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 9087926

AN - SCOPUS:0030624471

VL - 9

SP - 56

EP - 60

JO - Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation

JF - Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation

SN - 1040-6387

IS - 1

ER -