The prevalence of gastrointestinal problems in children across the United States with autism spectrum disorders from families with multiple affected members

Lulu W. Wang, Daniel J Tancredi, Dan W. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To perform a large registry-based study to determine the relative prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) problems in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from families with multiple affected members compared with their unaffected sibling(s). METHODS: In-home structured retrospective medical history interviews by parent recall were conducted by a pediatric neurologist. Our analysis sample included information about GI health of 589 subjects with idiopathic, familial ASD and 163 of their unaffected sibling controls registered with Autism Genetic Resource Exchange. Individuals with ASD were subgrouped into 3 autism severity groups (Full Autism, Almost Autism, and Spectrum) based on their Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and Autism Diagnostic Observation Scale scores. RESULTS: Parents reported significantly more GI problems in children with ASD (249/589; 42%) compared with their unaffected siblings (20/163; 12%) (p < .001). The 2 most common Gl problems in children with ASD were constipation (116/589; 20%) and chronic diarrhea (111/589; 19%). Conditional logistic regression analysis showed that having Full Autism (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 14.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.22-32.77) or Almost Autism (AOR = 5.16, 95% CI 2.02-13.21) was most highly associated with experiencing GI problems. Increased autism symptom severity was associated with higher odds of GI problems (AOR for trend = 2.63, 95% CI: 1.56-4.45). CONCLUSIONS: Parents report significantly more GI problems in children with familial ASD, especially those with Full Autism, than in their unaffected children. Increased autism symptom severity is associated with increased odds of having GI problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-360
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2011

Fingerprint

Autistic Disorder
Siblings
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Parents
Interviews
Constipation
Registries
Diarrhea
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Observation
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • AGRE
  • autism spectrum disorders
  • constipation
  • diarrhea
  • gastrointestinal problems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{0dfb7256f9984488b4a23778a4120251,
title = "The prevalence of gastrointestinal problems in children across the United States with autism spectrum disorders from families with multiple affected members",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To perform a large registry-based study to determine the relative prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) problems in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from families with multiple affected members compared with their unaffected sibling(s). METHODS: In-home structured retrospective medical history interviews by parent recall were conducted by a pediatric neurologist. Our analysis sample included information about GI health of 589 subjects with idiopathic, familial ASD and 163 of their unaffected sibling controls registered with Autism Genetic Resource Exchange. Individuals with ASD were subgrouped into 3 autism severity groups (Full Autism, Almost Autism, and Spectrum) based on their Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and Autism Diagnostic Observation Scale scores. RESULTS: Parents reported significantly more GI problems in children with ASD (249/589; 42{\%}) compared with their unaffected siblings (20/163; 12{\%}) (p < .001). The 2 most common Gl problems in children with ASD were constipation (116/589; 20{\%}) and chronic diarrhea (111/589; 19{\%}). Conditional logistic regression analysis showed that having Full Autism (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 14.28, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 6.22-32.77) or Almost Autism (AOR = 5.16, 95{\%} CI 2.02-13.21) was most highly associated with experiencing GI problems. Increased autism symptom severity was associated with higher odds of GI problems (AOR for trend = 2.63, 95{\%} CI: 1.56-4.45). CONCLUSIONS: Parents report significantly more GI problems in children with familial ASD, especially those with Full Autism, than in their unaffected children. Increased autism symptom severity is associated with increased odds of having GI problems.",
keywords = "AGRE, autism spectrum disorders, constipation, diarrhea, gastrointestinal problems",
author = "Wang, {Lulu W.} and Tancredi, {Daniel J} and Thomas, {Dan W.}",
year = "2011",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1097/DBP.0b013e31821bd06a",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "351--360",
journal = "Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics",
issn = "0196-206X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The prevalence of gastrointestinal problems in children across the United States with autism spectrum disorders from families with multiple affected members

AU - Wang, Lulu W.

AU - Tancredi, Daniel J

AU - Thomas, Dan W.

PY - 2011/6

Y1 - 2011/6

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To perform a large registry-based study to determine the relative prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) problems in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from families with multiple affected members compared with their unaffected sibling(s). METHODS: In-home structured retrospective medical history interviews by parent recall were conducted by a pediatric neurologist. Our analysis sample included information about GI health of 589 subjects with idiopathic, familial ASD and 163 of their unaffected sibling controls registered with Autism Genetic Resource Exchange. Individuals with ASD were subgrouped into 3 autism severity groups (Full Autism, Almost Autism, and Spectrum) based on their Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and Autism Diagnostic Observation Scale scores. RESULTS: Parents reported significantly more GI problems in children with ASD (249/589; 42%) compared with their unaffected siblings (20/163; 12%) (p < .001). The 2 most common Gl problems in children with ASD were constipation (116/589; 20%) and chronic diarrhea (111/589; 19%). Conditional logistic regression analysis showed that having Full Autism (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 14.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.22-32.77) or Almost Autism (AOR = 5.16, 95% CI 2.02-13.21) was most highly associated with experiencing GI problems. Increased autism symptom severity was associated with higher odds of GI problems (AOR for trend = 2.63, 95% CI: 1.56-4.45). CONCLUSIONS: Parents report significantly more GI problems in children with familial ASD, especially those with Full Autism, than in their unaffected children. Increased autism symptom severity is associated with increased odds of having GI problems.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To perform a large registry-based study to determine the relative prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) problems in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from families with multiple affected members compared with their unaffected sibling(s). METHODS: In-home structured retrospective medical history interviews by parent recall were conducted by a pediatric neurologist. Our analysis sample included information about GI health of 589 subjects with idiopathic, familial ASD and 163 of their unaffected sibling controls registered with Autism Genetic Resource Exchange. Individuals with ASD were subgrouped into 3 autism severity groups (Full Autism, Almost Autism, and Spectrum) based on their Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and Autism Diagnostic Observation Scale scores. RESULTS: Parents reported significantly more GI problems in children with ASD (249/589; 42%) compared with their unaffected siblings (20/163; 12%) (p < .001). The 2 most common Gl problems in children with ASD were constipation (116/589; 20%) and chronic diarrhea (111/589; 19%). Conditional logistic regression analysis showed that having Full Autism (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 14.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.22-32.77) or Almost Autism (AOR = 5.16, 95% CI 2.02-13.21) was most highly associated with experiencing GI problems. Increased autism symptom severity was associated with higher odds of GI problems (AOR for trend = 2.63, 95% CI: 1.56-4.45). CONCLUSIONS: Parents report significantly more GI problems in children with familial ASD, especially those with Full Autism, than in their unaffected children. Increased autism symptom severity is associated with increased odds of having GI problems.

KW - AGRE

KW - autism spectrum disorders

KW - constipation

KW - diarrhea

KW - gastrointestinal problems

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79958823858&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79958823858&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/DBP.0b013e31821bd06a

DO - 10.1097/DBP.0b013e31821bd06a

M3 - Article

C2 - 21555957

AN - SCOPUS:79958823858

VL - 32

SP - 351

EP - 360

JO - Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

JF - Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

SN - 0196-206X

IS - 5

ER -