The posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flap

Vascular anatomy and clinical application

J. A. Rubin, T. P. Whetzel, Thomas R Stevenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ten adult cadavers were used to accurately detail the vascular anatomy of posterior thigh skin. Fourteen posterior thigh specimens were dissected after blue latex injection of the internal and external iliac arteries. Six posterior thigh specimens underwent selective dye injection of individual profunda perforating arteries and the inferior gluteal artery. The findings reveal an extensive fascial plexus nourished primarily by fasciocutaneous branches of the first and second profunda perforating arteries and secondarily by a terminal fasciocutaneous branch of the inferior gluteal artery. From 1989 to 1992, 24 posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flaps were performed in 24 patients. There were 5 early postoperative complications (21 percent). All but one patient went on to satisfactory healing and stable wound coverage. Three posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flaps were used successfully despite ligation of their inferior gluteal artery blood supply in a previous surgical procedure. These anatomic and clinical findings confirm the reliability of a posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flap based primarily on the first and second profunda perforating arteries. The posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flap can survive in the absence of a patent inferior gluteal artery. Knowledge of the vascular anatomy extends the clinical applicability of the posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flap to patients who might otherwise be excluded because of prior injury or operative procedure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1228-1239
Number of pages12
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume95
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Thigh
Blood Vessels
Anatomy
Arteries
Injections
Iliac Artery
Latex
Operative Surgical Procedures
Cadaver
Wound Healing
Ligation
Coloring Agents
Skin
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

The posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flap : Vascular anatomy and clinical application. / Rubin, J. A.; Whetzel, T. P.; Stevenson, Thomas R.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 95, No. 7, 1995, p. 1228-1239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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