The neural basis of visual selective attention: A commentary on Harter and Aine

Steven A. Hillyard, George R Mangun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Harter and Aine (1984) have proposed a 'neural specificity' model of visual selective attention, based primarily on evidence from recordings of event-related brain potentials (ERPs) in human subjects. In this framework, they consider ERP components elicited during visual-spatial attention to reflect selective neural processing in the tectopulvinar-partietal pathway, whereas selection of visual attributes such as pattern, color, and orientation is manifested by ERPs arising from the geniculostriate-inferotemporal projection system. The present article examines the empirical basis for anatomically-specific hypotheses and considers alternative explanations for the observed ERP changes during selective attention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-279
Number of pages15
JournalBiological Psychology
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

The neural basis of visual selective attention : A commentary on Harter and Aine. / Hillyard, Steven A.; Mangun, George R.

In: Biological Psychology, Vol. 23, No. 3, 1986, p. 265-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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