The level of dietary protein affects the vitamin B-6 requirement of cats

S. C. Bai, D. A. Sampson, James Morris, Quinton Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A depletion-repletion model was used to study the effect of the level of dietary protein on the vitamin B-6 requirement of growing kittens. Twenty kittens were given a pyridoxine-free diet for 42 d to deplete vitamin B-6 reserves. They then were divided into four groups of five kittens each. Two groups were fed diets containing 30% casein with either 1.0 (Group 30-1) or 2.0 (Group 30-2) mg pyridoxine/kg diet and two groups were fed 60% casein diets with either 1.0 (Group 60-1) or 2.0 (Group 60-2) mg pyridoxine/kg diet for 44 d. During repletion, body weight gain of kittens from Group 30-2 was higher than that of kittens from the other groups. Body weight gains of kittens from Groups 30-1 and 60-2 were higher than that of kittens from Group 60-1, but there was no difference in body weight gain between Groups 30-1 and 60-2. At 44 d of repletion, kittens from Group 60-1 generally had higher plasma concentrations of free tyrosine and cystathionine, lower plasma B-6 vitamer concentrations and a higher urinary oxalate excretion than did kittens from the other groups. These findings indicate that the vitamin B-6 requirement of growing kittens - as is true of humans, chickens and mice - is positively related to the level of protein in the diet. For a 30% casein diet, the vitamin B-6 requirement was ≥1.0 but <2.0 mg pyridoxine/kg diet; for a 60% casein diet, the requirement was ≥2.0 mg pyridoxine/kg diet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1054-1061
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume121
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

Fingerprint

Vitamin B 6
Dietary Proteins
Cats
Diet
Pyridoxine
Caseins
Weight Gain
Body Weight
Cystathionine
Oxalates
Tyrosine
Chickens

Keywords

  • Cats
  • Cystathionine
  • Tyrosine
  • Urinary oxalate
  • Vitamin B-6 requirement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

The level of dietary protein affects the vitamin B-6 requirement of cats. / Bai, S. C.; Sampson, D. A.; Morris, James; Rogers, Quinton.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 121, No. 7, 01.01.1991, p. 1054-1061.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "A depletion-repletion model was used to study the effect of the level of dietary protein on the vitamin B-6 requirement of growing kittens. Twenty kittens were given a pyridoxine-free diet for 42 d to deplete vitamin B-6 reserves. They then were divided into four groups of five kittens each. Two groups were fed diets containing 30{\%} casein with either 1.0 (Group 30-1) or 2.0 (Group 30-2) mg pyridoxine/kg diet and two groups were fed 60{\%} casein diets with either 1.0 (Group 60-1) or 2.0 (Group 60-2) mg pyridoxine/kg diet for 44 d. During repletion, body weight gain of kittens from Group 30-2 was higher than that of kittens from the other groups. Body weight gains of kittens from Groups 30-1 and 60-2 were higher than that of kittens from Group 60-1, but there was no difference in body weight gain between Groups 30-1 and 60-2. At 44 d of repletion, kittens from Group 60-1 generally had higher plasma concentrations of free tyrosine and cystathionine, lower plasma B-6 vitamer concentrations and a higher urinary oxalate excretion than did kittens from the other groups. These findings indicate that the vitamin B-6 requirement of growing kittens - as is true of humans, chickens and mice - is positively related to the level of protein in the diet. For a 30{\%} casein diet, the vitamin B-6 requirement was ≥1.0 but <2.0 mg pyridoxine/kg diet; for a 60{\%} casein diet, the requirement was ≥2.0 mg pyridoxine/kg diet.",
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