The Kunming CalFit study

Modeling dietary behavioral patterns using smartphone data

Edmund Seto, Jenna Hua, Lemuel Wu, Aaron Bestick, Victor Shia, Sue Eom, Jay Han, May Wang, Yan Li

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human behavioral interventions aimed at improving health can benefit from objective wearable sensor data and mathematical models. Smartphone-based sensing is particularly practical for monitoring behavioral patterns because smartphones are fairly common, are carried by individuals throughout their daily lives, offer a variety of sensing modalities, and can facilitate various forms of user feedback for intervention studies. We describe our findings from a smartphone-based study, in which an Android-based application we developed called CalFit was used to collect information related to young adults' dietary behaviors. In addition to monitoring dietary patterns, we were interested in understanding contextual factors related to when and where an individual eats, as well as how their dietary intake relates to physical activity (which creates energy demand) and psychosocial stress. 12 participants were asked to use CalFit to record videos of their meals over two 1-week periods, which were translated into nutrient intake by trained dietitians. During this same period, triaxial accelerometry was used to assess each subject's energy expenditure, and GPS was used to record time-location patterns. Ecological momentary assessment was also used to prompt subjects to respond to questions on their phone about their psychological state. The GPS data were processed through a web service we developed called Foodscoremap that is based on the Google Places API to characterize food environments that subjects were exposed to, which may explain and influence dietary patterns. Furthermore, we describe a modeling framework that incorporates all of these information to dynamically infer behavioral patterns that may be used for future intervention studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages6884-6887
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781424479290
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014 - Chicago, United States
Duration: Aug 26 2014Aug 30 2014

Other

Other2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014
CountryUnited States
CityChicago
Period8/26/148/30/14

Fingerprint

Smartphones
Global positioning system
Accelerometry
Food
Nutritionists
Monitoring
Insurance Benefits
Application programming interfaces (API)
Web services
Energy Metabolism
Nutrients
Meals
Data structures
Young Adult
Theoretical Models
Health
Exercise
Mathematical models
Psychology
Feedback

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Seto, E., Hua, J., Wu, L., Bestick, A., Shia, V., Eom, S., ... Li, Y. (2014). The Kunming CalFit study: Modeling dietary behavioral patterns using smartphone data. In 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014 (pp. 6884-6887). [6945210] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2014.6945210

The Kunming CalFit study : Modeling dietary behavioral patterns using smartphone data. / Seto, Edmund; Hua, Jenna; Wu, Lemuel; Bestick, Aaron; Shia, Victor; Eom, Sue; Han, Jay; Wang, May; Li, Yan.

2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2014. p. 6884-6887 6945210.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Seto, E, Hua, J, Wu, L, Bestick, A, Shia, V, Eom, S, Han, J, Wang, M & Li, Y 2014, The Kunming CalFit study: Modeling dietary behavioral patterns using smartphone data. in 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014., 6945210, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 6884-6887, 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014, Chicago, United States, 8/26/14. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2014.6945210
Seto E, Hua J, Wu L, Bestick A, Shia V, Eom S et al. The Kunming CalFit study: Modeling dietary behavioral patterns using smartphone data. In 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2014. p. 6884-6887. 6945210 https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2014.6945210
Seto, Edmund ; Hua, Jenna ; Wu, Lemuel ; Bestick, Aaron ; Shia, Victor ; Eom, Sue ; Han, Jay ; Wang, May ; Li, Yan. / The Kunming CalFit study : Modeling dietary behavioral patterns using smartphone data. 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2014. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2014. pp. 6884-6887
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