The joys and terrors of fast adaptation: New findings elucidate antibiotic resistance and natural selection

John R. Roth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Experiments of Pränting and Andersson demonstrate how bacteria adapt to the growth limitation caused by antibiotic resistance mutations. The process of adaptation relies on gene copy number changes that arise at high rates, including duplications (10-4 per cell per generation), amplifications (10-2 per cell per generation) and mutant copy loss (10-2 per cell per division). Reversible increases in copy number improve growth by small steps and provide more targets for rare sequence alterations (10-9 per cell per division) that can stably improve growth. After sequence alteration, selection favours loss of the still mutant gene copies that accelerated adaptation. The results strongly support the amplification-reversion model for fast adaptation and argue against the alternative idea of 'stress-induced mutagenesis'.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-282
Number of pages4
JournalMolecular Microbiology
Volume79
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

Fingerprint

Genetic Selection
Microbial Drug Resistance
Cell Division
Growth
Gene Dosage
Mutagenesis
Bacteria
Mutation
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

The joys and terrors of fast adaptation : New findings elucidate antibiotic resistance and natural selection. / Roth, John R.

In: Molecular Microbiology, Vol. 79, No. 2, 01.2011, p. 279-282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a76e2e57f3224e95aa31287e038bcb10,
title = "The joys and terrors of fast adaptation: New findings elucidate antibiotic resistance and natural selection",
abstract = "Experiments of Pr{\"a}nting and Andersson demonstrate how bacteria adapt to the growth limitation caused by antibiotic resistance mutations. The process of adaptation relies on gene copy number changes that arise at high rates, including duplications (10-4 per cell per generation), amplifications (10-2 per cell per generation) and mutant copy loss (10-2 per cell per division). Reversible increases in copy number improve growth by small steps and provide more targets for rare sequence alterations (10-9 per cell per division) that can stably improve growth. After sequence alteration, selection favours loss of the still mutant gene copies that accelerated adaptation. The results strongly support the amplification-reversion model for fast adaptation and argue against the alternative idea of 'stress-induced mutagenesis'.",
author = "Roth, {John R.}",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2958.2010.07459.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "79",
pages = "279--282",
journal = "Molecular Microbiology",
issn = "0950-382X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The joys and terrors of fast adaptation

T2 - New findings elucidate antibiotic resistance and natural selection

AU - Roth, John R.

PY - 2011/1

Y1 - 2011/1

N2 - Experiments of Pränting and Andersson demonstrate how bacteria adapt to the growth limitation caused by antibiotic resistance mutations. The process of adaptation relies on gene copy number changes that arise at high rates, including duplications (10-4 per cell per generation), amplifications (10-2 per cell per generation) and mutant copy loss (10-2 per cell per division). Reversible increases in copy number improve growth by small steps and provide more targets for rare sequence alterations (10-9 per cell per division) that can stably improve growth. After sequence alteration, selection favours loss of the still mutant gene copies that accelerated adaptation. The results strongly support the amplification-reversion model for fast adaptation and argue against the alternative idea of 'stress-induced mutagenesis'.

AB - Experiments of Pränting and Andersson demonstrate how bacteria adapt to the growth limitation caused by antibiotic resistance mutations. The process of adaptation relies on gene copy number changes that arise at high rates, including duplications (10-4 per cell per generation), amplifications (10-2 per cell per generation) and mutant copy loss (10-2 per cell per division). Reversible increases in copy number improve growth by small steps and provide more targets for rare sequence alterations (10-9 per cell per division) that can stably improve growth. After sequence alteration, selection favours loss of the still mutant gene copies that accelerated adaptation. The results strongly support the amplification-reversion model for fast adaptation and argue against the alternative idea of 'stress-induced mutagenesis'.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78651066562&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78651066562&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2958.2010.07459.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2958.2010.07459.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 21219449

AN - SCOPUS:78651066562

VL - 79

SP - 279

EP - 282

JO - Molecular Microbiology

JF - Molecular Microbiology

SN - 0950-382X

IS - 2

ER -