The inheritance of extra-hepatic portosystemic shunts and elevated bile acid concentrations in Maltese dogs

C. A. O'Leary, A. Parslow, R. Malik, Geraldine B Hunt, R. I. Hurford, P. L C Tisdall, D. L. Duffy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To determine the heritability of extra-hepatic portosystemic shunts and elevated post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations in Maltese dogs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Maltese dogs were recruited and investigated by a variable combination of procedures including dynamic bile acid testing, rectal ammonia tolerance testing, ultrasonography, portal venography, surgical inspection or necropsy. In addition, nine test matings were carried out between affected and affected dogs, and affected and unaffected dogs. RESULTS: In 135 variably related Maltese, shunt status could be confirmed in 113, including 19 with anextra-hepatic portosystemic shunt (17 confirmed at surgery, 2 at necropsy). Rectal ammonia tolerance testing results and post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations were retrievable for 50 and 88 dogs, respectively. Pedigree information was available for these 135 and an additional 164 related dogs. Two consecutive test matings were carried out between two affected animals (whose shunts had been attenuated), with 2 of 8 (25%) of offspring having an extra-hepatic portosystemic shunt. Six test matings were carried out between an affected and an unaffected animal, with 2 of 22 (9%) offspring affected. Heritability of extra-hepatic portosystemic shunt was 0·61 calculated using variance components analysis [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·14 to 1·0, P=0·001]. The best fitting model from segregation analysis was a common, partially penetrant, recessive model (allele frequency 0·34, penetrance 0·99, CI 0·09 to 1·0). The heritability of elevated post-prandial serum bile acid (and thus likely portal vein hypoplasia) was 0·81 (CI 0·43 to 1·0, P=0·2) after logarithmic transformation of post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: There is strong support for extra-hepatic portosystemic shunts and elevated post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations both being inherited conditions in Maltese.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14-21
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Small Animal Practice
Volume55
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Surgical Portasystemic Shunt
bile acids
Bile Acids and Salts
inheritance (genetics)
Meals
Dogs
liver
dogs
Liver
confidence interval
Serum
heritability
testing
Confidence Intervals
Ammonia
necropsy
ammonia
penetrance
portal vein
Penetrance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Small Animals

Cite this

The inheritance of extra-hepatic portosystemic shunts and elevated bile acid concentrations in Maltese dogs. / O'Leary, C. A.; Parslow, A.; Malik, R.; Hunt, Geraldine B; Hurford, R. I.; Tisdall, P. L C; Duffy, D. L.

In: Journal of Small Animal Practice, Vol. 55, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 14-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O'Leary, C. A. ; Parslow, A. ; Malik, R. ; Hunt, Geraldine B ; Hurford, R. I. ; Tisdall, P. L C ; Duffy, D. L. / The inheritance of extra-hepatic portosystemic shunts and elevated bile acid concentrations in Maltese dogs. In: Journal of Small Animal Practice. 2014 ; Vol. 55, No. 1. pp. 14-21.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To determine the heritability of extra-hepatic portosystemic shunts and elevated post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations in Maltese dogs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Maltese dogs were recruited and investigated by a variable combination of procedures including dynamic bile acid testing, rectal ammonia tolerance testing, ultrasonography, portal venography, surgical inspection or necropsy. In addition, nine test matings were carried out between affected and affected dogs, and affected and unaffected dogs. RESULTS: In 135 variably related Maltese, shunt status could be confirmed in 113, including 19 with anextra-hepatic portosystemic shunt (17 confirmed at surgery, 2 at necropsy). Rectal ammonia tolerance testing results and post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations were retrievable for 50 and 88 dogs, respectively. Pedigree information was available for these 135 and an additional 164 related dogs. Two consecutive test matings were carried out between two affected animals (whose shunts had been attenuated), with 2 of 8 (25{\%}) of offspring having an extra-hepatic portosystemic shunt. Six test matings were carried out between an affected and an unaffected animal, with 2 of 22 (9{\%}) offspring affected. Heritability of extra-hepatic portosystemic shunt was 0·61 calculated using variance components analysis [95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 0·14 to 1·0, P=0·001]. The best fitting model from segregation analysis was a common, partially penetrant, recessive model (allele frequency 0·34, penetrance 0·99, CI 0·09 to 1·0). The heritability of elevated post-prandial serum bile acid (and thus likely portal vein hypoplasia) was 0·81 (CI 0·43 to 1·0, P=0·2) after logarithmic transformation of post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: There is strong support for extra-hepatic portosystemic shunts and elevated post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations both being inherited conditions in Maltese.",
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T1 - The inheritance of extra-hepatic portosystemic shunts and elevated bile acid concentrations in Maltese dogs

AU - O'Leary, C. A.

AU - Parslow, A.

AU - Malik, R.

AU - Hunt, Geraldine B

AU - Hurford, R. I.

AU - Tisdall, P. L C

AU - Duffy, D. L.

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N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine the heritability of extra-hepatic portosystemic shunts and elevated post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations in Maltese dogs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Maltese dogs were recruited and investigated by a variable combination of procedures including dynamic bile acid testing, rectal ammonia tolerance testing, ultrasonography, portal venography, surgical inspection or necropsy. In addition, nine test matings were carried out between affected and affected dogs, and affected and unaffected dogs. RESULTS: In 135 variably related Maltese, shunt status could be confirmed in 113, including 19 with anextra-hepatic portosystemic shunt (17 confirmed at surgery, 2 at necropsy). Rectal ammonia tolerance testing results and post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations were retrievable for 50 and 88 dogs, respectively. Pedigree information was available for these 135 and an additional 164 related dogs. Two consecutive test matings were carried out between two affected animals (whose shunts had been attenuated), with 2 of 8 (25%) of offspring having an extra-hepatic portosystemic shunt. Six test matings were carried out between an affected and an unaffected animal, with 2 of 22 (9%) offspring affected. Heritability of extra-hepatic portosystemic shunt was 0·61 calculated using variance components analysis [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·14 to 1·0, P=0·001]. The best fitting model from segregation analysis was a common, partially penetrant, recessive model (allele frequency 0·34, penetrance 0·99, CI 0·09 to 1·0). The heritability of elevated post-prandial serum bile acid (and thus likely portal vein hypoplasia) was 0·81 (CI 0·43 to 1·0, P=0·2) after logarithmic transformation of post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: There is strong support for extra-hepatic portosystemic shunts and elevated post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations both being inherited conditions in Maltese.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To determine the heritability of extra-hepatic portosystemic shunts and elevated post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations in Maltese dogs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Maltese dogs were recruited and investigated by a variable combination of procedures including dynamic bile acid testing, rectal ammonia tolerance testing, ultrasonography, portal venography, surgical inspection or necropsy. In addition, nine test matings were carried out between affected and affected dogs, and affected and unaffected dogs. RESULTS: In 135 variably related Maltese, shunt status could be confirmed in 113, including 19 with anextra-hepatic portosystemic shunt (17 confirmed at surgery, 2 at necropsy). Rectal ammonia tolerance testing results and post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations were retrievable for 50 and 88 dogs, respectively. Pedigree information was available for these 135 and an additional 164 related dogs. Two consecutive test matings were carried out between two affected animals (whose shunts had been attenuated), with 2 of 8 (25%) of offspring having an extra-hepatic portosystemic shunt. Six test matings were carried out between an affected and an unaffected animal, with 2 of 22 (9%) offspring affected. Heritability of extra-hepatic portosystemic shunt was 0·61 calculated using variance components analysis [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·14 to 1·0, P=0·001]. The best fitting model from segregation analysis was a common, partially penetrant, recessive model (allele frequency 0·34, penetrance 0·99, CI 0·09 to 1·0). The heritability of elevated post-prandial serum bile acid (and thus likely portal vein hypoplasia) was 0·81 (CI 0·43 to 1·0, P=0·2) after logarithmic transformation of post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: There is strong support for extra-hepatic portosystemic shunts and elevated post-prandial serum bile acid concentrations both being inherited conditions in Maltese.

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