The influence of neighborhood food stores on change in young girls' body mass index

Cindy W. Leung, Barbara A. Laraia, Maggi Kelly, Dana Nickleach, Nancy E. Adler, Lawrence H. Kushi, Irene H. Yen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: As the prevalence of childhood obesity has risen in past decades, more attention has been given to how the neighborhood food environment affects children's health outcomes. Purpose: This exploratory study examined the relationship between the presence of neighborhood food stores within a girl's neighborhood and 3-year risk of overweight/obesity and change in BMI, in girls aged 6 or 7 years at baseline. Methods: A longitudinal analysis of participants in the Cohort Study of Young Girls' Nutrition, Environment and Transitions (CYGNET) was conducted from 2005 to 2008. Neighborhood food stores were identified from a commercial database and classified according to industry codes in 2006. Generalized linear and logistic models were used to examine how availability of food stores within 0.25-mile and 1.0-mile network buffers of a girl's residence were associated with BMI z-score change and risk of overweight or obesity, adjusting for baseline BMI/weight and family sociodemographic characteristics. Data were analyzed in 2010. Results: Availability of convenience stores within a 0.25-mile network buffer of a girl's residence was associated with greater risk of overweight/obesity (OR=3.38, 95% CI=1.07, 10.68) and an increase in BMI z-score (β=0.13, 95% CI=0.00, 0.25). Availability of produce vendors/farmer's markets within a 1.0-mile network buffer of a girl's residence was inversely associated with overweight/obesity (OR=0.22, 95% CI=0.05, 1.06). A significant trend was observed between availability of produce vendors/farmer's markets and lower risk of overweight/obesity after 3 years. Conclusions: Although food store inventories were not assessed and food store indices were not created, the availability of neighborhood food stores may affect a young girl's weight trajectory over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-51
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Body Mass Index
Food
Obesity
Buffers
Weights and Measures
Pediatric Obesity
Linear Models
Industry
Cohort Studies
Logistic Models
Databases
Equipment and Supplies
Farmers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Leung, C. W., Laraia, B. A., Kelly, M., Nickleach, D., Adler, N. E., Kushi, L. H., & Yen, I. H. (2011). The influence of neighborhood food stores on change in young girls' body mass index. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 41(1), 43-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2011.03.013

The influence of neighborhood food stores on change in young girls' body mass index. / Leung, Cindy W.; Laraia, Barbara A.; Kelly, Maggi; Nickleach, Dana; Adler, Nancy E.; Kushi, Lawrence H.; Yen, Irene H.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 41, No. 1, 07.2011, p. 43-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leung, CW, Laraia, BA, Kelly, M, Nickleach, D, Adler, NE, Kushi, LH & Yen, IH 2011, 'The influence of neighborhood food stores on change in young girls' body mass index', American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 43-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2011.03.013
Leung, Cindy W. ; Laraia, Barbara A. ; Kelly, Maggi ; Nickleach, Dana ; Adler, Nancy E. ; Kushi, Lawrence H. ; Yen, Irene H. / The influence of neighborhood food stores on change in young girls' body mass index. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 41, No. 1. pp. 43-51.
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abstract = "Background: As the prevalence of childhood obesity has risen in past decades, more attention has been given to how the neighborhood food environment affects children's health outcomes. Purpose: This exploratory study examined the relationship between the presence of neighborhood food stores within a girl's neighborhood and 3-year risk of overweight/obesity and change in BMI, in girls aged 6 or 7 years at baseline. Methods: A longitudinal analysis of participants in the Cohort Study of Young Girls' Nutrition, Environment and Transitions (CYGNET) was conducted from 2005 to 2008. Neighborhood food stores were identified from a commercial database and classified according to industry codes in 2006. Generalized linear and logistic models were used to examine how availability of food stores within 0.25-mile and 1.0-mile network buffers of a girl's residence were associated with BMI z-score change and risk of overweight or obesity, adjusting for baseline BMI/weight and family sociodemographic characteristics. Data were analyzed in 2010. Results: Availability of convenience stores within a 0.25-mile network buffer of a girl's residence was associated with greater risk of overweight/obesity (OR=3.38, 95{\%} CI=1.07, 10.68) and an increase in BMI z-score (β=0.13, 95{\%} CI=0.00, 0.25). Availability of produce vendors/farmer's markets within a 1.0-mile network buffer of a girl's residence was inversely associated with overweight/obesity (OR=0.22, 95{\%} CI=0.05, 1.06). A significant trend was observed between availability of produce vendors/farmer's markets and lower risk of overweight/obesity after 3 years. Conclusions: Although food store inventories were not assessed and food store indices were not created, the availability of neighborhood food stores may affect a young girl's weight trajectory over time.",
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