The influence of amino acids on the neuroregulation of food intake

Quinton Rogers, P. M B Leung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

105 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rats markedly decrease their food intake when fed a diet that is either low in or devoid of a single indispensable amino acid, containing an excess of one amino acid, or containing a high level of protein. The importance of the ventromedial hypothalamus, amygdala, septum, prepyriform cortex, and olfactory bulb in feeding behavior was tested by placing bilateral lesions (or by olfactory bulbectomy) in most of these brain areas and then subjecting the animals to a series of dietary tests. Except for the ventromedial hypothalamus, bilateral lesions did not change the quantity of a low amino acid or protein basal diet eaten by the rats. There was no change in the depression of food intake normally seen in rat fed disproportionate amounts of dietary amino acids when lesions were placed in the ventromedial hypothalamus, posterior or anterior amygdala, or septum, or after olfactory bulbectomy. Rats with lesions in the medial amygdala did not decrease their food intake when fed an amino acid imbalanced diet, but did when one essential amino acid was completely removed or when an excess of leucine or a high protein diet was fed. Rats with lesions in the anterior prepyriform cortex did not decrease their food intake when fed an amino acid imbalaned diet or one devoid of a single indispensable amino acid, but did decrease their intake when fed a high leucine or high protein diet. Olfactory bulbectomy did not alter the rat's response to any of the above diets. It therefore appears that the prepyriform cortex and medial amygadala are intimately involved in the food intake response of rats fed diets low in or devoid of a single indispensable amino acid, but not involved in the food intake response of rats fed a high leucine or high protein diet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1709-1719
Number of pages11
JournalFederation Proceedings
Volume32
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1 1973

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The influence of amino acids on the neuroregulation of food intake'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this