The influence of aluminum on resistance to Listeria monocytogenes in Swiss-Webster mice

S. Yoshida, M. Eric Gershwin, Carl L Keen, J. M. Donald, M. S. Golub

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Female, adult Swiss-Webster mice were fed, during gestation and subsequent lactation, diets containing either 25 (control), 500 or 1,000 μg Al/g diet in the form of Al lactate, followed by challenge with Listeria monocytogenes. Mice in the groups fed 1,000 and 500 μg Al/g had significantly lowered resistance to bacterial infection when compared to control animals (p < 0.025). The animals given 1,000 μg Al/g also had higher concentrations of liver Al (p < 0.05) than controls. Pups derived from these dams showed no differences in mortality rates or Al tissue levels. In contrast, nonpregnant animals fed 1,000 μg Al/g for 6 weeks had a slight decrease in mortality rate when compared to control animals. Dose-related changes in tissue Al levels were not observed in these adult, virgin mice. Finally, adult nonpregnant mice were injected subcutaneously with PBS only, or with 1, 5 or 10 mg of Al (in the form of Al lactate) per kilogram body weight followed by bacterial challenge. Animals which received 5 mg Al/kg had lower mortality rates to L. monocytogenes when compared to other treatment groups (p < 0.025). This data suggests that Al has the potential to influence host resistance to bacterial infection depending on the physiological state of the host; it provides additional evidence for the role of Al as an environmental toxin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)404-409
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Archives of Allergy and Applied Immunology
Volume89
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1989

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Listeria monocytogenes
Aluminum
Bacterial Infections
Mortality
Lactic Acid
Diet
Lactation
Body Weight
Pregnancy
Liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

The influence of aluminum on resistance to Listeria monocytogenes in Swiss-Webster mice. / Yoshida, S.; Gershwin, M. Eric; Keen, Carl L; Donald, J. M.; Golub, M. S.

In: International Archives of Allergy and Applied Immunology, Vol. 89, No. 4, 1989, p. 404-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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