The in vivo estrogenic and in vitro anti-estrogenic activity of permethrin and bifenthrin

Susanne M. Brander, Guochun He, Kelly L. Smalling, Michael S. Denison, Gary N. Cherr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pyrethroids are highly toxic to fish at parts per billion or parts per trillion concentrations. Their intended mechanism is prolonged sodium channel opening, but recent studies reveal that pyrethroids such as permethrin and bifenthrin also have endocrine activity. Additionally, metabolites may have greater endocrine activity than parent compounds. The authors evaluated the in vivo concentration-dependent ability of bifenthrin and permethrin to induce choriogenin (an estrogen-responsive protein) in Menidia beryllina, a fish species known to reside in pyrethroid-contaminated aquatic habitats. The authors then compared the in vivo response with an in vitro assay-chemical activated luciferase gene expression (CALUX). Juvenile M. beryllina exposed to bifenthrin (1, 10, 100ng/L), permethrin (0.1, 1, 10μg/L), and ethinylestradiol (1, 10, 50ng/L) had significantly higher ng/mL choriogenin (Chg) measured in whole body homogenate than controls. Though Chg expression in fish exposed to ethinylestradiol (EE2) exhibited a traditional sigmoidal concentration response, curves fit to Chg expressed in fish exposed to pyrethroids suggest a unimodal response, decreasing slightly as concentration increases. Whereas the in vivo response indicated that bifenthrin and permethrin or their metabolites act as estrogen agonists, the CALUX assay demonstrated estrogen antagonism by the pyrethroids. The results, supported by evidence from previous studies, suggest that bifenthrin and permethrin, or their metabolites, appear to act as estrogen receptor (ER) agonists in vivo, and that the unmetabolized pyrethroids, particularly bifenthrin, act as an ER antagonists in cultured mammalian cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2848-2855
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Volume31
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

bifenthrin
Permethrin
permethrin
Pyrethrins
pyrethroid
Fish
Estrogens
Fishes
Metabolites
metabolite
Ethinyl Estradiol
fish
Luciferases
Gene expression
gene expression
Assays
Gene Expression
antagonism
Sodium Channels
Poisons

Keywords

  • CALUX
  • Choriogenin
  • ELISA
  • Menidia beryllina
  • Nonlinear regression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

The in vivo estrogenic and in vitro anti-estrogenic activity of permethrin and bifenthrin. / Brander, Susanne M.; He, Guochun; Smalling, Kelly L.; Denison, Michael S.; Cherr, Gary N.

In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 31, No. 12, 12.2012, p. 2848-2855.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brander, Susanne M. ; He, Guochun ; Smalling, Kelly L. ; Denison, Michael S. ; Cherr, Gary N. / The in vivo estrogenic and in vitro anti-estrogenic activity of permethrin and bifenthrin. In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. 2012 ; Vol. 31, No. 12. pp. 2848-2855.
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