The Impact of Helicobacter pylori Infection on the Gastric Microbiota of the Rhesus Macaque

Miriam E. Martin, Srijak Bhatnagar, Michael D. George, Bruce J. Paster, Don R. Canfield, Jonathan A Eisen, Jay V Solnick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori colonization is highly prevalent among humans and causes significant gastric disease in a subset of those infected. When present, this bacterium dominates the gastric microbiota of humans and induces antimicrobial responses in the host. Since the microbial context of H. pylori colonization influences the disease outcome in a mouse model, we sought to assess the impact of H. pylori challenge upon the pre-existing gastric microbial community members in the rhesus macaque model. Deep sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene identified a community profile of 221 phylotypes that was distinct from that of the rhesus macaque distal gut and mouth, although there were taxa in common. High proportions of both H. pylori and H. suis were observed in the post-challenge libraries, but at a given time, only one Helicobacter species was dominant. However, the relative abundance of non-Helicobacter taxa was not significantly different before and after challenge with H. pylori. These results suggest that while different gastric species may show competitive exclusion in the gastric niche, the rhesus gastric microbial community is largely stable despite immune and physiological changes due to H. pylori infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere76375
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 8 2013

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Helicobacter pylori
Microbiota
Helicobacter Infections
Macaca mulatta
Stomach
stomach
infection
Bacteria
Genes
microbial communities
Helicobacter
Stomach Diseases
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
competitive exclusion
digestive system diseases
rRNA Genes
Libraries
Mouth
microbiome
mouth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The Impact of Helicobacter pylori Infection on the Gastric Microbiota of the Rhesus Macaque. / Martin, Miriam E.; Bhatnagar, Srijak; George, Michael D.; Paster, Bruce J.; Canfield, Don R.; Eisen, Jonathan A; Solnick, Jay V.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 10, e76375, 08.10.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martin, Miriam E. ; Bhatnagar, Srijak ; George, Michael D. ; Paster, Bruce J. ; Canfield, Don R. ; Eisen, Jonathan A ; Solnick, Jay V. / The Impact of Helicobacter pylori Infection on the Gastric Microbiota of the Rhesus Macaque. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 10.
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