The global burden of childhood and adolescent cancer in 2017: an analysis of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017

GBD 2017 Childhood Cancer Collaborators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Accurate childhood cancer burden data are crucial for resource planning and health policy prioritisation. Model-based estimates are necessary because cancer surveillance data are scarce or non-existent in many countries. Although global incidence and mortality estimates are available, there are no previous analyses of the global burden of childhood cancer represented in disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs). Methods: Using the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) 2017 methodology, childhood (ages 0–19 years) cancer mortality was estimated by use of vital registration system data, verbal autopsy data, and population-based cancer registry incidence data, which were transformed to mortality estimates through modelled mortality-to-incidence ratios (MIRs). Childhood cancer incidence was estimated using the mortality estimates and corresponding MIRs. Prevalence estimates were calculated by using MIR to model survival and multiplied by disability weights to obtain years lived with disability (YLDs). Years of life lost (YLLs) were calculated by multiplying age-specific cancer deaths by the difference between the age of death and a reference life expectancy. DALYs were calculated as the sum of YLLs and YLDs. Final point estimates are reported with 95% uncertainty intervals. Findings: Globally, in 2017, there were 11·5 million (95% uncertainty interval 10·6–12·3) DALYs due to childhood cancer, 97·3% (97·3–97·3) of which were attributable to YLLs and 2·7% (2·7–2·7) of which were attributable to YLDs. Childhood cancer was the sixth leading cause of total cancer burden globally and the ninth leading cause of childhood disease burden globally. 82·2% (82·1–82·2) of global childhood cancer DALYs occurred in low, low-middle, or middle Socio-demographic Index locations, whereas 50·3% (50·3–50·3) of adult cancer DALYs occurred in these same locations. Cancers that are uncategorised in the current GBD framework comprised 26·5% (26·5–26·5) of global childhood cancer DALYs. Interpretation: The GBD 2017 results call attention to the substantial burden of childhood cancer globally, which disproportionately affects populations in resource-limited settings. The use of DALY-based estimates is crucial in demonstrating that childhood cancer burden represents an important global cancer and child health concern. Funding: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities (ALSAC), and St. Baldrick's Foundation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1211-1225
Number of pages15
JournalThe Lancet Oncology
Volume20
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2019

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Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Neoplasms
Mortality
Incidence
Global Burden of Disease
Uncertainty
Charities
Health Policy
Life Expectancy
Information Systems
Population
Registries
Autopsy
Demography
Weights and Measures
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

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The global burden of childhood and adolescent cancer in 2017 : an analysis of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. / GBD 2017 Childhood Cancer Collaborators.

In: The Lancet Oncology, Vol. 20, No. 9, 09.2019, p. 1211-1225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d7b19c71d39446e8965e439c7a6df679,
title = "The global burden of childhood and adolescent cancer in 2017: an analysis of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017",
abstract = "Background: Accurate childhood cancer burden data are crucial for resource planning and health policy prioritisation. Model-based estimates are necessary because cancer surveillance data are scarce or non-existent in many countries. Although global incidence and mortality estimates are available, there are no previous analyses of the global burden of childhood cancer represented in disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs). Methods: Using the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) 2017 methodology, childhood (ages 0–19 years) cancer mortality was estimated by use of vital registration system data, verbal autopsy data, and population-based cancer registry incidence data, which were transformed to mortality estimates through modelled mortality-to-incidence ratios (MIRs). Childhood cancer incidence was estimated using the mortality estimates and corresponding MIRs. Prevalence estimates were calculated by using MIR to model survival and multiplied by disability weights to obtain years lived with disability (YLDs). Years of life lost (YLLs) were calculated by multiplying age-specific cancer deaths by the difference between the age of death and a reference life expectancy. DALYs were calculated as the sum of YLLs and YLDs. Final point estimates are reported with 95{\%} uncertainty intervals. Findings: Globally, in 2017, there were 11·5 million (95{\%} uncertainty interval 10·6–12·3) DALYs due to childhood cancer, 97·3{\%} (97·3–97·3) of which were attributable to YLLs and 2·7{\%} (2·7–2·7) of which were attributable to YLDs. Childhood cancer was the sixth leading cause of total cancer burden globally and the ninth leading cause of childhood disease burden globally. 82·2{\%} (82·1–82·2) of global childhood cancer DALYs occurred in low, low-middle, or middle Socio-demographic Index locations, whereas 50·3{\%} (50·3–50·3) of adult cancer DALYs occurred in these same locations. Cancers that are uncategorised in the current GBD framework comprised 26·5{\%} (26·5–26·5) of global childhood cancer DALYs. Interpretation: The GBD 2017 results call attention to the substantial burden of childhood cancer globally, which disproportionately affects populations in resource-limited settings. The use of DALY-based estimates is crucial in demonstrating that childhood cancer burden represents an important global cancer and child health concern. Funding: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities (ALSAC), and St. Baldrick's Foundation.",
author = "{GBD 2017 Childhood Cancer Collaborators} and Force, {Lisa M.} and Ibrahim Abdollahpour and Advani, {Shailesh M.} and Dominic Agius and Elham Ahmadian and Fares Alahdab and Tahiya Alam and Animut Alebel and Vahid Alipour and Allen, {Christine A.} and Amir Almasi-Hashiani and Alvarez, {Elysia M.} and Saeed Amini and Amoako, {Yaw Ampem} and Anber, {Nahla Hamed} and Jalal Arabloo and Al Artaman and Suleman Atique and Ashish Awasthi and Mojtaba Bagherzadeh and Huda Basaleem and Bekru, {Eyasu Tamru} and Ali Bijani and Bogale, {Kassawmar Angaw} and Mate Car and F{\'e}lix Carvalho and Clara Castro and Ferr{\'a}n Catal{\'a}-L{\'o}pez and Chu, {Dinh Toi} and Costa, {Vera M.} and Darwish, {Amira Hamed} and Demeke, {Feleke Mekonnen} and Demis, {Asmamaw Bizuneh} and Demoz, {Gebre Teklemariam} and Dharmaratne, {Samath Dhamminda} and Do, {Huyen Phuc} and Doan, {Linh Phuong} and Manisha Dubey and Aziz Eftekhari and Ziad El-Khatib and Emamian, {Mohammad Hassan} and Farhangi, {Mahdieh Abbasalizad} and Eduarda Fernandes and Florian Fischer and {Fouladi Fard}, Reza and Friedrich, {Paola M.} and Takeshi Fukumoto and Gedefaw, {Getnet Azeze} and Ahmad Ghashghaee and Asadollah Gholamian",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/S1470-2045(19)30339-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "1211--1225",
journal = "The Lancet Oncology",
issn = "1470-2045",
publisher = "Lancet Publishing Group",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - The global burden of childhood and adolescent cancer in 2017

T2 - an analysis of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017

AU - GBD 2017 Childhood Cancer Collaborators

AU - Force, Lisa M.

AU - Abdollahpour, Ibrahim

AU - Advani, Shailesh M.

AU - Agius, Dominic

AU - Ahmadian, Elham

AU - Alahdab, Fares

AU - Alam, Tahiya

AU - Alebel, Animut

AU - Alipour, Vahid

AU - Allen, Christine A.

AU - Almasi-Hashiani, Amir

AU - Alvarez, Elysia M.

AU - Amini, Saeed

AU - Amoako, Yaw Ampem

AU - Anber, Nahla Hamed

AU - Arabloo, Jalal

AU - Artaman, Al

AU - Atique, Suleman

AU - Awasthi, Ashish

AU - Bagherzadeh, Mojtaba

AU - Basaleem, Huda

AU - Bekru, Eyasu Tamru

AU - Bijani, Ali

AU - Bogale, Kassawmar Angaw

AU - Car, Mate

AU - Carvalho, Félix

AU - Castro, Clara

AU - Catalá-López, Ferrán

AU - Chu, Dinh Toi

AU - Costa, Vera M.

AU - Darwish, Amira Hamed

AU - Demeke, Feleke Mekonnen

AU - Demis, Asmamaw Bizuneh

AU - Demoz, Gebre Teklemariam

AU - Dharmaratne, Samath Dhamminda

AU - Do, Huyen Phuc

AU - Doan, Linh Phuong

AU - Dubey, Manisha

AU - Eftekhari, Aziz

AU - El-Khatib, Ziad

AU - Emamian, Mohammad Hassan

AU - Farhangi, Mahdieh Abbasalizad

AU - Fernandes, Eduarda

AU - Fischer, Florian

AU - Fouladi Fard, Reza

AU - Friedrich, Paola M.

AU - Fukumoto, Takeshi

AU - Gedefaw, Getnet Azeze

AU - Ghashghaee, Ahmad

AU - Gholamian, Asadollah

PY - 2019/9

Y1 - 2019/9

N2 - Background: Accurate childhood cancer burden data are crucial for resource planning and health policy prioritisation. Model-based estimates are necessary because cancer surveillance data are scarce or non-existent in many countries. Although global incidence and mortality estimates are available, there are no previous analyses of the global burden of childhood cancer represented in disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs). Methods: Using the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) 2017 methodology, childhood (ages 0–19 years) cancer mortality was estimated by use of vital registration system data, verbal autopsy data, and population-based cancer registry incidence data, which were transformed to mortality estimates through modelled mortality-to-incidence ratios (MIRs). Childhood cancer incidence was estimated using the mortality estimates and corresponding MIRs. Prevalence estimates were calculated by using MIR to model survival and multiplied by disability weights to obtain years lived with disability (YLDs). Years of life lost (YLLs) were calculated by multiplying age-specific cancer deaths by the difference between the age of death and a reference life expectancy. DALYs were calculated as the sum of YLLs and YLDs. Final point estimates are reported with 95% uncertainty intervals. Findings: Globally, in 2017, there were 11·5 million (95% uncertainty interval 10·6–12·3) DALYs due to childhood cancer, 97·3% (97·3–97·3) of which were attributable to YLLs and 2·7% (2·7–2·7) of which were attributable to YLDs. Childhood cancer was the sixth leading cause of total cancer burden globally and the ninth leading cause of childhood disease burden globally. 82·2% (82·1–82·2) of global childhood cancer DALYs occurred in low, low-middle, or middle Socio-demographic Index locations, whereas 50·3% (50·3–50·3) of adult cancer DALYs occurred in these same locations. Cancers that are uncategorised in the current GBD framework comprised 26·5% (26·5–26·5) of global childhood cancer DALYs. Interpretation: The GBD 2017 results call attention to the substantial burden of childhood cancer globally, which disproportionately affects populations in resource-limited settings. The use of DALY-based estimates is crucial in demonstrating that childhood cancer burden represents an important global cancer and child health concern. Funding: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities (ALSAC), and St. Baldrick's Foundation.

AB - Background: Accurate childhood cancer burden data are crucial for resource planning and health policy prioritisation. Model-based estimates are necessary because cancer surveillance data are scarce or non-existent in many countries. Although global incidence and mortality estimates are available, there are no previous analyses of the global burden of childhood cancer represented in disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs). Methods: Using the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) 2017 methodology, childhood (ages 0–19 years) cancer mortality was estimated by use of vital registration system data, verbal autopsy data, and population-based cancer registry incidence data, which were transformed to mortality estimates through modelled mortality-to-incidence ratios (MIRs). Childhood cancer incidence was estimated using the mortality estimates and corresponding MIRs. Prevalence estimates were calculated by using MIR to model survival and multiplied by disability weights to obtain years lived with disability (YLDs). Years of life lost (YLLs) were calculated by multiplying age-specific cancer deaths by the difference between the age of death and a reference life expectancy. DALYs were calculated as the sum of YLLs and YLDs. Final point estimates are reported with 95% uncertainty intervals. Findings: Globally, in 2017, there were 11·5 million (95% uncertainty interval 10·6–12·3) DALYs due to childhood cancer, 97·3% (97·3–97·3) of which were attributable to YLLs and 2·7% (2·7–2·7) of which were attributable to YLDs. Childhood cancer was the sixth leading cause of total cancer burden globally and the ninth leading cause of childhood disease burden globally. 82·2% (82·1–82·2) of global childhood cancer DALYs occurred in low, low-middle, or middle Socio-demographic Index locations, whereas 50·3% (50·3–50·3) of adult cancer DALYs occurred in these same locations. Cancers that are uncategorised in the current GBD framework comprised 26·5% (26·5–26·5) of global childhood cancer DALYs. Interpretation: The GBD 2017 results call attention to the substantial burden of childhood cancer globally, which disproportionately affects populations in resource-limited settings. The use of DALY-based estimates is crucial in demonstrating that childhood cancer burden represents an important global cancer and child health concern. Funding: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities (ALSAC), and St. Baldrick's Foundation.

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