The genetic ancestry of American Creole cattle inferred from uniparental and autosomal genetic markers

BioBovis Consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cattle imported from the Iberian Peninsula spread throughout America in the early years of discovery and colonization to originate Creole breeds, which adapted to a wide diversity of environments and later received influences from other origins, including zebu cattle in more recent years. We analyzed uniparental genetic markers and autosomal microsatellites in DNA samples from 114 cattle breeds distributed worldwide, including 40 Creole breeds representing the whole American continent, and samples from the Iberian Peninsula, British islands, Continental Europe, Africa and American zebu. We show that Creole breeds differ considerably from each other, and most have their own identity or group with others from neighboring regions. Results with mtDNA indicate that T1c-lineages are rare in Iberia but common in Africa and are well represented in Creoles from Brazil and Colombia, lending support to a direct African influence on Creoles. This is reinforced by the sharing of a unique Y-haplotype between cattle from Mozambique and Creoles from Argentina. Autosomal microsatellites indicate that Creoles occupy an intermediate position between African and European breeds, and some Creoles show a clear Iberian signature. Our results confirm the mixed ancestry of American Creole cattle and the role that African cattle have played in their development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number11486
JournalScientific reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

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Genetic Markers
Microsatellite Repeats
Mozambique
Colombia
Argentina
Mitochondrial DNA
Islands
Haplotypes
Brazil
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

The genetic ancestry of American Creole cattle inferred from uniparental and autosomal genetic markers. / BioBovis Consortium.

In: Scientific reports, Vol. 9, No. 1, 11486, 01.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Cattle imported from the Iberian Peninsula spread throughout America in the early years of discovery and colonization to originate Creole breeds, which adapted to a wide diversity of environments and later received influences from other origins, including zebu cattle in more recent years. We analyzed uniparental genetic markers and autosomal microsatellites in DNA samples from 114 cattle breeds distributed worldwide, including 40 Creole breeds representing the whole American continent, and samples from the Iberian Peninsula, British islands, Continental Europe, Africa and American zebu. We show that Creole breeds differ considerably from each other, and most have their own identity or group with others from neighboring regions. Results with mtDNA indicate that T1c-lineages are rare in Iberia but common in Africa and are well represented in Creoles from Brazil and Colombia, lending support to a direct African influence on Creoles. This is reinforced by the sharing of a unique Y-haplotype between cattle from Mozambique and Creoles from Argentina. Autosomal microsatellites indicate that Creoles occupy an intermediate position between African and European breeds, and some Creoles show a clear Iberian signature. Our results confirm the mixed ancestry of American Creole cattle and the role that African cattle have played in their development.",
author = "{BioBovis Consortium} and Catarina Ginja and Gama, {Luis Telo} and Oscar Cort{\'e}s and Burriel, {Inmaculada Martin} and Vega-Pla, {Jose Luis} and Cecilia Penedo and Phil Sponenberg and Javier Ca{\~n}{\'o}n and Arianne Sanz and {do Egito}, {Andrea Alves} and Alvarez, {Luz Angela} and Guillermo Giovambattista and Saif Agha and Andr{\'e}s Rogberg-Mu{\~n}oz and Lara, {Maria Aparecida Cassiano} and S{\'o}nia Afonso and Lenin Aguirre and Eileen Armstrong and Vallejo, {Maria Esperanza Camacho} and Amado Canales and Bernardo Cassam{\'a} and Gloria Contreras and Cordeiro, {J. M.Moras} and Susana Dunner and Ahmed Elbeltagy and Fioravanti, {Maria Clorinda Soares} and Carpio, {Mayra G{\'o}mez} and Mariano G{\'o}mez and Antonio Hern{\'a}ndez and Darwin Hernandez and Juliano, {Raquel Soares} and Vincenzo Landi and Ribamar Marques and Mart{\'i}nez, {Rub{\'e}n D.} and Mart{\'i}nez, {O. Roberto} and Lilia Melucci and Flores, {Baldomero Molina} and Fernando M{\'u}jica and {Par{\'e}s i Casanova}, {Pere Miquel} and Jorge Quiroz and Clementina Rodellar and Gerald Tjon and Tumininu Adebambo and Odalys Uffo and Vargas, {Julio C{\'e}sar} and Axel Villalobos and Pilar Zaragoza and Delgado, {Juan Vicente} and Amparo Martinez",
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