The external validity of asperger disorder: Lack of evidence from the domain of neuropsychology

Judith N. Miller, Sally J Ozonoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

164 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study compared individuals with high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder (AD) in intellectual, motor, visuospatial, and executive function domains. Participants with AD demonstrated significantly higher Verbal and Full Scale IQ scores, significantly larger Verbal-Performance IQ discrepancies, and significantly better visual-perceptual skills than those with HFA. Once the superior intellectual abilities of the AD group were controlled (both statistically through analysis of covariance and by examining IQ-matched subgroups of HFA and AD participants), no significant group differences in motor, visuospatial, or executive functions were evident, save a marginally significant trend toward poorer fine motor performance in the AD group. This suggests that AD may simply be 'high-IQ autism' and that separate names for the disorders may not be warranted. The relation of these findings to theories of autism and AD are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-238
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume109
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Asperger Syndrome
Neuropsychology
Autistic Disorder
Executive Function
Aptitude
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

The external validity of asperger disorder : Lack of evidence from the domain of neuropsychology. / Miller, Judith N.; Ozonoff, Sally J.

In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Vol. 109, No. 2, 2000, p. 227-238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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