The effects of mindfulness meditation on cognitive processes and affect in patients with past depression

Wiveka Ramel, Philip R Goldin, Paula E. Carmona, John R. McQuaid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

297 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study describes the effects of an 8-week course in Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR; J. Kabat-Zinn, 1982, 1990) on affective symptoms (depression and anxiety), dysfunctional attitudes, and rumination. Given the focus of mindfulness meditation (MM) in modifying cognitive processes, it was hypothesized that the primary change in MM practice involves reductions in ruminative tendencies. We studied a sample of individuals with lifetime mood disorders who were assessed prior to and upon completion of an MBSR course. We also compared a waitlist sample matched with a subset of the MBSR completers. Overall, the results suggest that MM practice primarily leads to decreases in ruminative thinking, even after controlling for reductions in affective symptoms and dysfunctional beliefs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-455
Number of pages23
JournalCognitive Therapy and Research
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004

Fingerprint

Mindfulness
Meditation
Depression
Affective Symptoms
Mood Disorders
Anxiety

Keywords

  • Affective disorders
  • Cognitive processes
  • Meditation
  • Rumination
  • Treatment outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

The effects of mindfulness meditation on cognitive processes and affect in patients with past depression. / Ramel, Wiveka; Goldin, Philip R; Carmona, Paula E.; McQuaid, John R.

In: Cognitive Therapy and Research, Vol. 28, No. 4, 08.2004, p. 433-455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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