The effects of hypothyroidism and thyroid replacement on the development of carpal tunnel syndrome

Carl F. Palumbo, Robert M Szabo, Stephen L. Olmsted

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hypothyroidism is commonly included as an important risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), yet no study clearly defines the nature of this association. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between hypothyroidism and CTS in a controlled study. Twenty-six hypothyroid patients (45 hands) meeting our inclusion criteria with a diagnosis of primary hypothyroidism were questioned regarding date of diagnosis of hypothyroidism, duration and dose of thyroid replacement, and the presence, character, and duration of CTS symptoms. Twenty-four healthy volunteers (47 hands) were used as controls. Clinical examination included sensibility testing with Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, Weber 2-point discrimination testing, examining for thenar muscle atrophy and weakness, Phalen's test, Tinel's sign at the wrist, and the manual compression test. Electrodiagnostic testing including distal motor latency and distal sensory latency was performed on the median nerve at the wrist on all subjects. Nineteen patients (73%; 31 hands [68%]) displayed symptoms of CTS; of these, 16 patients (25 hands) had clinical examinations consistent with CTS. Only 6 of the 16 patients with clinical CTS (7 of 25 hands) had electrical studies that supported a diagnosis of CTS. All these symptomatic patients were biochemically euthyroid. All control subjects had normal electrical study results and normal sensibility testing. Two subjects had positive clinical examinations, giving a false-positive rate of 4%. Carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms are common in hypothyroid patients even when they are euthyroid. In this group of patients, normal median nerve latencies at the wrist in the presence of CTS symptoms and a positive physical examination are more prevalent than expected by the reported sensitivities of electrodiagnostic testing. Standards for assessing normal median nerve latencies may be significantly different in hypothyroid patients. Copyright (C) 2000 by the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)734-739
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Hand Surgery
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Hypothyroidism
Thyroid Gland
Hand
Median Nerve
Wrist
Muscular Atrophy
Muscle Weakness
Physical Examination
Healthy Volunteers

Keywords

  • Carpal tunnel
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Nerve compression
  • Thyroid disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

The effects of hypothyroidism and thyroid replacement on the development of carpal tunnel syndrome. / Palumbo, Carl F.; Szabo, Robert M; Olmsted, Stephen L.

In: Journal of Hand Surgery, Vol. 25, No. 4, 2000, p. 734-739.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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