The effects of excessive vocalization on acoustic and videostroboscopic measures of vocal fold condition

Eric A. Mann, Michael D. McClean, Joyce Gurevich-Uvena, Julie Barkmeier, Pearline McKenzie-Garner, Jeffrey Paffrath, Carl Patow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although dysphonia is a recognized consequence of acute vocal abuse, associated changes in vocal fold appearance and function are not well understood. To document these presumed effects of vocal abuse, audio recordings of sustained vowel production were obtained from 42 drill sergeants daily during the first 6 days of a vocally demanding training exercise. Acoustic analysis showed abnormal levels of jitter and shimmer on Day 1 in 16 of the 42 subjects. Considering only the 26 subjects who showed normal voice acoustics on Day 1, the median levels of jitter and shimmer varied little over the course of training, and significant increases in jitter and shimmer were not seen during the study period. However, the distributions for both jitter and shimmer became more positively skewed and showed a greater number of positive outliers over the course of training. This trend was attributed to 11 subjects who showed two or more instances of abnormal voice acoustics over Days 2 through 6. Laryngeal videostroboscopic recordings of sustained vowel production also were obtained prior to and following training. Perceptual ratings of these recordings by 2 observers revealed significant increases in vocal fold edema, erythema, and edge irregularity, and decreases in vocal fold mucosal wave and amplitude of excursion following the 5-day training period. In general, there was considerable intersubject variability in the extent of acoustic and videostroboscopic effects over the course of training. Of the two types of data, videostroboscopy appears to provide a more sensitive indication of the effects of excessive vocalization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)294-302
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Voice
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Perturbation
  • Videostroboscopy
  • Vocal abuse
  • Vocal fold

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The effects of excessive vocalization on acoustic and videostroboscopic measures of vocal fold condition'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this