The effects of baseline characteristics, glycaemia treatment approach, and glycated haemoglobin concentration on the risk of severe hypoglycaemia: Post hoc epidemiological analysis of the ACCORD study

Michael E. Miller, Denise E. Bonds, Hertzel C. Gerstein, Elizabeth R. Seaquist, Richard M. Bergenstal, Jorge Calles-Escandon, R. Dale Childress, Timothy E. Craven, Robert M. Cuddihy, George Dailey, Mark N. Feinglos, Farmarz Ismail-Beigi, Joe F. Largay, Patrick J. O'Connor, Terri Paul, Peter J. Savage, Ulrich K. Schubart, Ajay Sood, Saul Genuth

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Abstract

Objectives: To investigate potential determinants of severe hypoglycaemia, including baseline characteristics, in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial and the association of severe hypoglycaemia with levels of glycated haemoglobin (haemoglobin A1C) achieved during therapy. Design: Post hoc epidemiological analysis of a double 2x2 factorial, randomised, controlled trial. Setting: Diabetes clinics, research clinics, and primary care clinics. Participants: 10 209 of the 10 251 participants enrolled in the ACCORD study with type 2 diabetes, a haemoglobin A1C concentration of 7.5% or more during screening, and aged 40-79 years with established cardiovascular disease or 55-79 years with evidence of significant atherosclerosis, albuminuria, left ventricular hypertrophy, or two or more additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease (dyslipidaemia, hypertension, current smoker, or obese). Interventions: Intensive (haemoglobin A1C <6.0%) or standard (haemoglobin A1C 7.0-7.9%) glucose control. Main outcome measures: Severe hypoglycaemia was defined as episodes of "low blood glucose" requiring the assistance of another person and documentation of either a plasma glucose less than 2.8 mmol/l (<50 mg/dl) or symptoms that promptly resolved with oral carbohydrate, intravenous glucose, or glucagon. Results: The annual incidence of hypoglycaemia was 3.14% in the intensive treatment group and 1.03% in the standard glycaemia group. We found significantly increased risks for hypoglycaemia among women (P=0.0300), African-Americans (P<0.0001 compared with non-Hispanic whites), those with less than a high school education (P<0.0500 compared with college graduates), aged participants (P<0.0001 per 1 year increase), and those who used insulin at trial entry (P<0.0001). For every 1% unit decline in the haemoglobin A1C concentration from baseline to 4 month visit, there was a 28% (95% CI 19% to 37%) and 14% (4% to 23%) reduced risk of hypoglycaemia requiring medical assistance in the standard and intensive groups, respectively. In both treatment groups, the risk of hypoglycaemia requiring medical assistance increased with each 1% unit increment in the average updated haemoglobin A 1C concentration (standard arm: hazard ratio 1.76, 95% CI 1.50 to 2.06; intensive arm: hazard ratio 1.15, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.21). Conclusions: A greater drop in haemoglobin A1C concentration from baseline to the 4 month visit was not associated with an increased risk for hypoglycaemia. Patients with poorer glycaemic control had a greater risk of hypoglycaemia, irrespective of treatment group. Identification of baseline subgroups with increased risk for severe hypoglycaemia can provide guidance to clinicians attempting to modify patient therapy on the basis of individual risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberb5444
Number of pages1
JournalBMJ (Online)
Volume340
Issue number7738
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 16 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Miller, M. E., Bonds, D. E., Gerstein, H. C., Seaquist, E. R., Bergenstal, R. M., Calles-Escandon, J., Childress, R. D., Craven, T. E., Cuddihy, R. M., Dailey, G., Feinglos, M. N., Ismail-Beigi, F., Largay, J. F., O'Connor, P. J., Paul, T., Savage, P. J., Schubart, U. K., Sood, A., & Genuth, S. (2010). The effects of baseline characteristics, glycaemia treatment approach, and glycated haemoglobin concentration on the risk of severe hypoglycaemia: Post hoc epidemiological analysis of the ACCORD study. BMJ (Online), 340(7738), [b5444]. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.b5444