The effects of anxiolytics and other agents on rat grooming behavior

T. W. Moody, Z. Merali, Jacqueline Crawley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BN and other peptides increase grooming activity in rodents. This increase in grooming activity caused by BN can be reversed by numerous agents. The most direct of these are BN receptor antagonists such as spantide and [D-Phe-12]BN. These agents reverse the increase in grooming activity caused by BN and inhibit binding to central BN receptors. The increase in grooming activity caused by BN may be mediated by other neurotransmitters, such as dopamine. In this regard the increase in grooming activity caused by BN is reversed by fluphenazine and haloperidol. These agents do not affect binding to central BN receptors. Similarly, the increase in grooming caused by BN is absent if dopamine-containing neurons are lesioned with 6-OHDA. These lesions cause a significant reduction in central BN receptors, especially in the central amygdaloid nucleus. Thus some of the BN receptors may be present on dopamine-containing neurons. The increase in grooming activity caused by BN was also reversed by diazepam and chlordiazepoxide. Neither of these agents affected binding to central BN receptors, and similarly, BN did not affect binding to central benzodiazepine receptors. Thus anxiolytics may act at a site anatomically downstream from the BN receptors and reduce the apparent stress caused by central injection of BN.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)281-290
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume525
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Grooming
Anti-Anxiety Agents
Rats
Dopamine
Neurons
Fluphenazine
Chlordiazepoxide
Dopaminergic Neurons
Oxidopamine
Haloperidol
GABA-A Receptors
Diazepam
Neurotransmitter Agents
Peptides
Rat
Rodentia
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

The effects of anxiolytics and other agents on rat grooming behavior. / Moody, T. W.; Merali, Z.; Crawley, Jacqueline.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 525, 1988, p. 281-290.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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